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Will Europe THC Limit Increase to 0.3%?

Big day for European hemp farmers and the CBD industry as the allowance of THC in industrial hemp was voted on by Parliament. While still low compared to countries like Switzerland, this Europe THC limit increase would certainly loosen things up. A lot goes on in the world of legal cannabis. Sign-up to our newsletter […]

The post Will Europe THC Limit Increase to 0.3%? appeared first on CBD Testers.

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Big day for European hemp farmers and the CBD industry as the allowance of THC in industrial hemp was voted on by Parliament. While still low compared to countries like Switzerland, this Europe THC limit increase would certainly loosen things up.

A lot goes on in the world of legal cannabis. Sign-up to our newsletter to always be in-the-loop.

Hemp farmers in Europe have been pushing for change for quite some time. The .2% THC limit that was instituted many years ago has been making it difficult, and decreasing the amount of strains possible to use. Now, Parliament has voted to increase that maximum to .3%, included in the Common Agricultural Policy reform. But will it actually go through?

Where did .2% come from?

The first time a standard was set for a Europe THC limit in industrial hemp, was in 1984 when it was put at .5%. This was lowered in the 1970’s to .3%. At that time, .3% was the line that separated low-THC hemp (usually high-CBD flowers, but also high-CBG strains exist) and high-THC cannabis. In 1999 this dropped down again to the .2% that its been since, with the original aim being to prevent high-THC marijuana from being grown in low-THC industrial hemp fields. The proposal to increase the THC limit is not new, and has been pushed for quite some time.

thousands of years with plenty of evidence for how, when, and where. Yet it’s mainly treated like this history is meaningless, with paid-for research studies being the bottom line, when often they are not. This inability to learn from history is frustrating, and it becomes all the more obvious how much of an issue it is, when Europe makes arguments about not raising a THC limit to a level it had already functioned perfectly at for years.

It should also be noted that while this vote was made nearly a week ago, that no large publications have covered it all. In fact, the only publications to cover the news are hemp-related.

Why it matters

If a person didn’t know much about cannabis, they might expect that THC could simply be removed at whatever percentage is necessary. Unfortunately, that’s not how it works, and different strains of hemp have different amounts of THC. Not only that, CBD often goes up in proportion to THC, meaning that a lot of strains have been counted out since in order to get the level of CBD, it would mean accepting over .2% THC. While raising to .3% doesn’t make it all inclusive, it would make it so that more strains can be grown.

Is it a done deal?

decision does not rely solely on Parliament. The policy for adopting and/or amending legislation in the EU is for three different bodies to approve, or come to some decision. The vote last week was not to pass legislation, but merely to establish the opinion of Parliament on the Common Agricultural Policy reform proposal.

In order for it to actually go into effect, there are two more bodies that have to approve: The Council of the European Union and the European Commission. The three bodies are slated to begin negotiations on the agricultural policy reforms come mid-November. This assuming that issues related to the Coronavirus don’t force postponements.

What are the reforms?

A broad-ranging agricultural policy includes all kinds of laws, however the only ones of concern here, are the ones related to growing hemp. The two amendments to the Common Agricultural Policy of note to cannabis-news followers are these:

  • Amendments 8 & 93 – to raise the current allowable THC amount in industrial hemp from .2% to .3%.
  • Amendment 234 – Allows hemp to be covered by marketing standards for the EU so that products can eventually be graded according to appearance, consistency, characteristics, and restrictions. This includes labeling, packaging, production methods, etc.
2019, the EU amended its Novel Food Catalogue to include extracts of cannabis sativa L. like CBD. Being added to this category means that cannabis extracts are considered to have no demonstrable history of consumption. Looking at history, we know this isn’t actually true at all, but once again, history was ignored in favor of regulation tactics. Though the Novel Food regulation isn’t binding, most countries seem to go by it as a rule, and it could very well be that Europe pressures them to do so (though this is only supposition). Before any product can be placed on the market, it requires a safety assessment under Novel Food regulation (which again, isn’t actually binding).

Prior to 2019, extracts of cannabis in which CBD had higher levels than in the actual plant were considered novel, but nothing else. Cannabis sativa L. could be grown at that time so long as the specific strain was registered in the EU “Common Catalogue of Varieties of Agricultural Plant Species”, and with a THC level not above .2%. Essentially, adding cannabis extracts to the Novel Food list made it that much more restrictive to sell CBD products. Though this new update to the Common Agricultural Policy wouldn’t exclude hemp from Novel Food regulation (which is about to be updated again), it would at least ease some of the restrictions that are put on it, and the products that can come out of it. When an industry is so restrictive on so many fronts, any amount of loosening of the rules allows for more general freedom.

The European Industrial Hemp Association is viewing the parliamentary vote as a success, and in a way it is, but it’s not the end of the story. These updates do not have to be approved, or used, if the two other governing bodies decide they’re out of line. In this way, this vote is really just a stepping stone in a much longer process, for which it’s still impossible to know the ending.

Conclusion

It’s hard to tell which way legislation will go. Europe tends to lean more towards loosening restrictions than other locations, but at the same time, goes back on itself constantly. Simply adding cannabis extracts to the Novel Food category was a step backwards, made only 1.5 years ago. It might be hard to imagine Europe not taking up the agricultural recommendations, but nothing says it has to either. So while the European Industrial Hemp Association rejoices, it might be a bit soon. When it comes to cannabis regulation, things don’t tend to make sense…nearly anywhere. So expecting a straight line to legalization, is expecting way too much. Maybe the Europe THC limit really will be raised. And maybe it won’t be. But it’s just too soon to say.

Thanks so much for stopping by CBDtesters.co, your one-stop-shop for all cannabis-related news. Stop by regularly to stay up-to-date, and sign up to our newsletter so you never miss a beat.

Resources

Everything You Need To Know About CBD Isolate (a deep look into hemp extracts)
Synthetic Cannabinoids (Are they synthetic cannabinoids safe?)
The Endocannabinoid System Explained (Why Cannabis Is Good for Our Bodies)

Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19
Newest Cannabinoid Powerhouse – CBC – What Can It Do for You?
Cannabinoids 101 – Spotlight on CBN (Cannabinol)

Cannabis Cosmetics: What’s Allowed, What’s Not, and Where to Find Them (What is the latest regulations in Europe and which products are allowed)
Government Assistance Options for U.S. Hemp Farmers Affected By COVID-19
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
Your Complete Guide to EU GMP-Certified CBD Isolate and Distillate (European Market)
EU GMP-Certified Cannabinoid Isolates and Distillates (Why is it so difficult to get EU-GMP raw materials in Europe)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
The Legal Landscape Of CBD Hemp Flower In Europe

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc)Regulators Go After Smokable Hemp Flower – What Does The Future Hold?

Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2020/10/29/will-europe-thc-limit-be-increased-to-3/

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Top 5 Cannabis-Infused Drinks

Not all people consuming cannabis like the idea of smoking or vaping. Some are looking for alternative forms of consumption. The good news is that alternatives do exist as there are many ways to use cannabis. One of these alternative forms is by drinking cannabis-infused beverages. They can be both alcoholic and non-alcoholic. It’s important to note that any alcoholic cannabis-infused beverages that are available on the market must meet

The post Top 5 Cannabis-Infused Drinks appeared first on CBD Education Online.

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Top 5 Cannabis-Infused Drinks

Not all people consuming cannabis like the idea of smoking or vaping. Some are looking for alternative forms of consumption. The good news is that alternatives do exist as there are many ways to use cannabis. One of these alternative forms is by drinking cannabis-infused beverages. They can be both alcoholic and non-alcoholic. It’s important to note that any alcoholic cannabis-infused beverages that are available on the market must meet the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) requirements. Even though marijuana has been legalized in many American states, there are still strict regulation standards for drinkable cannabis. Therefore, each marijuana-infused drink must be approved before being sold. That’s one of the reasons why it still may be difficult to buy this type of beverage. Luckily, it is not hard to make a cannabis-infused drink by yourself. Let’s consider some of the most popular ways of consuming cannabis in drinks!

1. Cannabis-Infused Milk

Cannabis-Infused MilkThis is one of the most popular ways to drink marijuana. To prepare it, you need four cups of milk and nearly a quarter ounce of ground cannabis. Try to choose the highest quality ingredients. Don’t buy cheap products as your drink will depend a lot on the quality of your ingredients.

First, you need to decarboxylate your marijuana which means to activate its psychoactive components by heating it in the oven. You should keep cannabis at a temperature of about 275 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, pour the milk into a boiler and allow it to simmer. Then, add the marijuana and stir it occasionally for 30 minutes until it is thoroughly blended with the milk, which will change colour to spring green. Before serving, cool the milk for at least an hour.

You can not only drink cannabis milk alone but also use it as an ingredient for other recipes. Once you make it, cannabis-infused milk allows you to prepare many more beverages and edibles with weed.

2. Cannabis Lemonade

Cannabis LemonadeThere are a number of recipes for making cannabis lemonade depending on the desired flavour. To achieve the best result in lemonade preparation, you should use a cannabis tincture which you can either get from a dispensary or make at home.

Making cannabis lemonade only requires squeezed lemons, water, and sugar. Take 2 tablespoons of cannabis tincture for every 1/4 cup of lemon juice, 1 ¾ cups water, and 1/3 cup of sugar or honey.  You can add some ice and garnishes according to preference, for instance, fresh strawberries.

3. Protein Shake

Protein ShakeIf you are into fitness and a healthy lifestyle, you can try a marijuana protein shake. It’s really easy to make using cannabis coconut oil. First, you need to boil coconut oil and cannabis together, then just add it to your usual protein shake. Enjoy this healthy and delicious alternative to ordinary sports drinks!

4. Cannabis Iced Tea

Cannabis Iced TeaTo make this refreshing drink, you need to add cannabis to your tea blend, put it into a bag, then place it in boiling water. The longer it steeps in hot water, the more potent your drink will be. You can also use cannabis tinctures or milk instead of a teabag. Add some spices to taste and add ice. To sweeten your iced tea, you may add sugar or honey. This beverage is definitely worth trying!

5. Coffee

Cannabis coffeeIf you always start your morning with a cup of flavoured coffee, make your routine a little bit different. You can do it by adding a tablespoon or two of cannabis oil to your cup of joe. If you are trying to cut on calories, coconut oil can replace cream and sugar for you. This may be a great alternative to traditional coffee as a cannabis drink can enhance your mood and give you energy for the whole day. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your morning drinks and find out what works best for you.

 

Everyone has different preferences even when it comes to marijuana consumption. Luckily, today cannabis is available in various forms. You can choose from edibles, sweets, and even drinks. It’s absolutely up to you whether to buy cannabis-infused beverages or to make them yourself. You can create your own cannabis drink according to your preference which is limited only by your imagination. Marijuana-infused drinks can be considered a healthier alternative to smoking, but still don’t forget that everything should be in moderation. Note that cannabis drinks can give you a more potent experience and a stronger high. Moreover, some people like that drinkable weed brings its effects faster than edibles as it is digested more quickly and its components are absorbed into the bloodstream more easily. Typically, cannabis drinks take around 30 minutes to kick in. On the other hand, because of the faster ingestion, cannabis-infused drinks may last between 2 – 4 hours.

by Tia M., Editor and Contributor at AskGrowers

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Source: https://cbdeducationonline.com/top-5-cannabis-infused-drinks/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=top-5-cannabis-infused-drinks

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The Difference Between Hemp and Cannabis

Traditionally the industry categorizes the marijuana plant by “Indica”, “Sativa”, and “Hybrid”. However, the more we learn about the hemp and cannabis plants, the more we discover this approach is flawed. It is becoming outdated. This historic system typically applies to cannabis, but does not translate well for the hemp industry as a whole. Research […]

The post The Difference Between Hemp and Cannabis appeared first on GreenBox.

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Traditionally the industry categorizes the marijuana plant by “Indica”, “Sativa”, and “Hybrid”. However, the more we learn about the hemp and cannabis plants, the more we discover this approach is flawed. It is becoming outdated. This historic system typically applies to cannabis, but does not translate well for the hemp industry as a whole. Research continues to show that we need a more sophisticated structure. One which accurately describes the different varieties of this unique plant. Once and for all, we will clarify how to navigate these plant varieties in a science led way.

We have discussed in the past that, according to science, hemp and cannabis are the same plant. We also know that this plant can do many different things based on its chemical makeup. This chemical makeup refers to cannabinoids, terpenes, and other compounds that the plant creates. Hence, the most accurate way we are today able to classify this plant is by its chemotype.

The word “chemotype” sounds pretty fancy. But, it’s actually a simple term when we break it down. Think of it as the blend of the words “chemical” and “type”. So really, we are trying to classify the cannabis and hemp class based on their chemical makeups. Currently, there are 5 types of chemotypes that focus on just the cannabinoids; Types I – V. Note that it does not consider the other compounds available in the plant, like terpenes. This is important as we will be looking at classifications based on terpenes in our next post! 

The Difference Between Hemp and Cannabis

Why are chemotypes important?

What are these chemotypes and why are they so important? The first 3 types are pretty straightforward. They finally give us a scientific difference between hemp and cannabis as we know it. To put it simply, Type I is high THC, low CBD content. Type II has a roughly 50:50 split of THC to CBD. While Type III is high in CBD and has a max amount of 0.3% THC. We dive into more detail for the full five types below.

Type I & II – cannabis

We categorise Type I as high in THC, and this is typically what we refer to as cannabis. It is also referred to as marijuana, too. We know that THC is psychoactive and is what causes the “high” associated with cannabis. Type II is less psychoactive than Type I. However, it still maintains a sufficiently high level of THC that would impair the consumer, albeit less so.

So, chemotypes I and II fall under the traditional cannabis category. These types are still illegal in a recreational sense in the U.K, EU and much of the US. However, they are increasingly available through medical programmes across the world, including the UK. Access is still limited, though.

Unfortunately, the lack of legality has stymied significant medical research of Type I and Type II categorized products. It is to the point that there is little expertise outside of the United States and Israel.

Type 3 – hemp

The Type III chemotype is where traditional hemp falls. As the U.K. and EU have recently raised the max THC limit to 0.3%, they now match US regulations. This further establishes said concentration as the standard THC limit for hemp. This reclassification now allows for consistency across the borders and truly establishes hemp as a Type III chemotype.

The physical effects of Type III products are significantly different than that of Type I and II. Type III is much more mellow and relaxed, and lacks the impairment that comes with Types I and II. Type III material is not psychoactive and will be the main focus for medical research in years to come.

Interestingly, while Type I and II will also go through significant testing for medical research, the associated “high” makes it difficult to prescribe as a kind of daily use-type medication.

Type 4 – rich in CBG

Type IV cannabis and hemp plants are gaining traction over the last year. These are plants which are high in Cannabigerol, or CBG. Researchers are interested in CBG because it binds directly to the body’s cannabinoid receptors. This is unlike CBD which does not do this. Further, it has a slightly higher affinity for binding to the CB2 receptors over the CB1 receptors.

Also, CBG is not psychoactive so it will not impair the consumer in the same way that THC does. Needless to say, there is a lot of excitement about CBG. But, we are still learning about its function and benefits to the human body. CBG does offer wellness benefits but it will take some time to quantify what those benefits will be.

Type 5 – no cannabinoids

Finally, we are at Type V of hemp and cannabis. This chemotype does not produce any cannabinoids at all! The science community is still figuring out what function they can serve. One idea is that they may be helpful in stabilizing the genetics of Types I – IV chemotypes, for example.

Drew Ford, our Hemp Advisor, says, “as we expand the industry I fully expect more chemotypes to be confirmed. This will happen as we stabilise more genetic variations which have a focus on the other minor cannabinoids. It is somewhat short-sighted to think we can classify this plant and its 113+ cannabinoids with just a few categories. By focusing on the chemical makeup we discover it is a much more accurate system to understand the amazing benefits of this plant”.

Source: https://www.greenbox.co.uk/the-difference-between-hemp-and-cannabis/

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GreenheartCBD Founder Paul Walsh named to the All-Ireland Business All Star List

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Greenheart, the leading licensed Irish sustainable producer, is delighted to announce that company co-founder and visionary Paul Walsh, has received a Thought Leadership award for innovation, technology, and sustainability, from the All-Ireland Business Foundation All-Star Ireland awards.

This prestigious accolade is given to a very small number of leading business innovators and visionaries in Ireland each year. The award follows closely on Greenheart’s own accreditation by the All Ireland Business Foundation. This accreditation is an outstanding achievement and recognizes the hard work and dedication of the Greenheart team in providing the best in class service to all our customers.

Greenheart was founded two years ago in Ashbourne, County Meath, and was formed two years ago by childhood friends Mark Canavan and Paul Walsh. The company produces a full range of sustainable oils – and shortly – edibles and balms for the retail market. Although Greenheart only began selling its oils in January 2020, it already has over 1,500 customers, a customer return rate three times the industry average and over seventy trusted 5-star reviews on its website. 

Before launching Greenheart, Paul and Mark spent years researching extraction methods to produce the most effective agricultural products, for the end consumer with full traceability from seed to shelf. The company is the first sustainable producer in its market to use the full scope of cutting edge technology in its cultivation and production. This includes Big Data, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning, and Blockchain technology at each stage of the planting, harvesting, production, and retailing process.

Greenheart Punt Token

The company is launching its own product token on December 1st – the Greenheart Punt – which will trade on the LAToken exchange and allow its stakeholders to access its products at the greatest possible discounts on its new apps platform. 

The Greenheart Punt token is being backed by a real commodity – 1,000 liters of Greenheart’s oil in year 1 (with a retail value of $4 million US dollars) – allowing token holders to redeem their tokens directly for Greenheart oil.
The company also plans to continue deploying pioneering sustainability technology and cold press extraction, while also launching an Innovation Centre to teach farmers and the wilder public about the benefits of growing hemp and sustainable crops in Ireland.


Source: Shane Walsh GreenheartCBD.ie

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