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USDA Rules for Hemp Production: iHEMPx Response

Farmers across the United States have been eager to learn more about hemp and how this crop can benefit their businesses and families. For the last six years, more and more farmers have chosen to transition fields to hemp over other, less lucrative, crops. For most of these farmers, the hemp plant has provided higher returns than traditional crops, and we have seen acreage increase every season since hemp was reintroduced in 2014. Today, many farmers are concerned that hemp may be more challenging to grow successfully than in years past. The reason for concern lies in the recently released USDA interim draft rules. The main areas of concern emerging right now are the change in sampling and testing protocols, as well as Total THC requirements.  While we may have opted to change the language of some of these regulations, they did not come as a huge surprise. Being based in Colorado, iHEMPx has always dealt with Total THC testing requirements with the Colorado Department of Agriculture. While it’s been more loosely regulated than the new rules propose, testing has been happening for years in Colorado, and our testing has taken into account Total THC levels, not just Delta 9 THC.  Although this new rule will make it a little more challenging for farmers to stay in compliance, it should surprise no one that regulators found it necessary to include more stringent new guidelines.  It would have been a big win for the industry, and for farmers across the US, if the rules had remained the same this season. Farmers would have continued to feel confident in growing compliant hemp, and in their ability to find success with each crop. However, it was naive to think a loose regulatory environment could have lasted much longer. Taking into account only Delta 9 THC would have left the door wide open for problems on the consumer level. Hemp crops testing under 0.3% Delta 9 THC could still have as much as 10%+ THCa, which would likely cause psychoactive effects in consumers. So although this new rule will make it a little more challenging for farmers to stay in compliance, it should surprise no one that regulators found it necessary to include more stringent new guidelines.  So what can farmers do to be successful in 2020? 1. Know what genetics you’re using going into this next year. Our genetics have been bred in a Total THC compliance state since 2014. Options do exist for farmers to have success but selecting the right genetics partner when sourcing seeds and starts is crucial.  2. Explore the potential for CBG crops for 2020. Our new CBG varieties are showing Total THC compliance even after flower is trimmed.  3. Have a working plan to stay within compliance. Ensure you have the know-how and resources to do your own testing throughout the season to position yourself for the appropriate harvest window to remain within compliance.  4. Submit your comments and concerns directly to the USDA. The public comment period is now open and will remain open through December 30th, 2019. You can submit your comments at the following link: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=AMS_FRDOC_0001-1919.  Lastly, don’t get discouraged!  This industry is going to continue to grow, and along with that comes growing pains. We are firm believers in “where there’s a will, there’s a way” and we feel no differently now.  Both iHEMPx and High Grade Hemp Seed are here to help farmers find success in this industry. Don’t hesitate to reach out to us to see how we can advise your farming efforts. We all need to work together to find smart solutions that can work not only for large corporations, but for small companies and family farms as well. If there’s one thing I’m certain of, it is the long term opportunity of hemp. This plant is here to stay as an agricultural crop – and the future will be better for it. The team here at iHEMPx couldn’t be more excited to be a part of it all.  Mike Leago, CEO & the iHEMPx Team

The post USDA Rules for Hemp Production: iHEMPx Response appeared first on iHEMPx.

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Farmers across the United States have been eager to learn more about hemp and how this crop can benefit their businesses and families. For the last six years, more and more farmers have chosen to transition fields to hemp over other, less lucrative, crops. For most of these farmers, the hemp plant has provided higher returns than traditional crops, and we have seen acreage increase every season since hemp was reintroduced in 2014.

Today, many farmers are concerned that hemp may be more challenging to grow successfully than in years past. The reason for concern lies in the recently released USDA interim draft rules. The main areas of concern emerging right now are the change in sampling and testing protocols, as well as Total THC requirements. 

While we may have opted to change the language of some of these regulations, they did not come as a huge surprise. Being based in Colorado, iHEMPx has always dealt with Total THC testing requirements with the Colorado Department of Agriculture. While it’s been more loosely regulated than the new rules propose, testing has been happening for years in Colorado, and our testing has taken into account Total THC levels, not just Delta 9 THC. 

Although this new rule will make it a little more challenging for farmers to stay in compliance, it should surprise no one that regulators found it necessary to include more stringent new guidelines. 

It would have been a big win for the industry, and for farmers across the US, if the rules had remained the same this season. Farmers would have continued to feel confident in growing compliant hemp, and in their ability to find success with each crop. However, it was naive to think a loose regulatory environment could have lasted much longer. Taking into account only Delta 9 THC would have left the door wide open for problems on the consumer level. Hemp crops testing under 0.3% Delta 9 THC could still have as much as 10%+ THCa, which would likely cause psychoactive effects in consumers. So although this new rule will make it a little more challenging for farmers to stay in compliance, it should surprise no one that regulators found it necessary to include more stringent new guidelines. 

So what can farmers do to be successful in 2020?

1. Know what genetics you’re using going into this next year. Our genetics have been bred in a Total THC compliance state since 2014. Options do exist for farmers to have success but selecting the right genetics partner when sourcing seeds and starts is crucial. 

2. Explore the potential for CBG crops for 2020. Our new CBG varieties are showing Total THC compliance even after flower is trimmed. 

3. Have a working plan to stay within compliance. Ensure you have the know-how and resources to do your own testing throughout the season to position yourself for the appropriate harvest window to remain within compliance. 

4. Submit your comments and concerns directly to the USDA. The public comment period is now open and will remain open through December 30th, 2019. You can submit your comments at the following link: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=AMS_FRDOC_0001-1919

Lastly, don’t get discouraged! 

This industry is going to continue to grow, and along with that comes growing pains. We are firm believers in “where there’s a will, there’s a way” and we feel no differently now. 

Both iHEMPx and High Grade Hemp Seed are here to help farmers find success in this industry. Don’t hesitate to reach out to us to see how we can advise your farming efforts. We all need to work together to find smart solutions that can work not only for large corporations, but for small companies and family farms as well.

If there’s one thing I’m certain of, it is the long term opportunity of hemp. This plant is here to stay as an agricultural crop – and the future will be better for it. The team here at iHEMPx couldn’t be more excited to be a part of it all. 

Mike Leago, CEO & the iHEMPx Team

Source: https://ihempx.com/usda-hemp-response/

Heartland

Will I get high from a gummy with 4.5 mg cbd and .5 mg thc? I have no tolerance.

Republished by Plato

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Visit our community site for vetted suppliers at http://theCBD.place. It’s time that this subject was given more internet exposure. We are here to discuss topics related to medical marijuana and our experiences using CBD. Please do not assume that anyone here is a medical professional.

Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/CBD/comments/jfj84y/will_i_get_high_from_a_gummy_with_45_mg_cbd_and_5/

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Montana prohibitionists ask Supreme Court to kick legalization off ballot

Trailing badly in the polls, Montana prohibitionists appeal to anti-legalization judges to bail them out.

The post Montana prohibitionists ask Supreme Court to kick legalization off ballot appeared first on Leafly.

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With two weeks to go until Election Day, and with a marijuana legalization measure showing a 10-point lead in the polls, prohibitionists are making a last-ditch attempt to keep the initiative off the November ballot.

On Tuesday, Oct. 20, the organization Wrong for Montana filed a petition with the state Supreme Court to have Initiative 190 deemed void and removed from the ballot, even though the measure has already been deemed legally sufficient by the state’s attorney general’s office. Furthermore, thousands of Montanans have already cast their ballots by mail.

The anti-legalization group argues that the initiative is unconstitutional because it allocates tax revenue raised by the program for specific purposes. Proponents of the measure have demonstrated that the initiative merely proposes how to allocate the funds; the state Legislature would have the final say on how to distribute them.

Trying the ol’ Nebraska Hail-Mary

The lawsuit in Montana replicates a legal strategy successfully employed by Republican prohibitionists in Nebraska this year: If you can’t get the votes, try to get anti-legalization judges to undermine the voice of the people.

“Opposition campaigns have been spreading misinformation across Montana for weeks,” Pepper Petersen, spokesperson for New Approach Montana, said in a recent interview. “This lawsuit accusation, this announcement by the lawyers is just the latest chapter in their misinformation campaign. The people in Montana will see right through it as they continue to vote yes on CI-118 and I-190.”

“We all talked about where we would like to see the money go,” he added in a separate interview. “That’s what you do when you bring initiatives, but it’s up to the Legislature to make that decision.”

Related

Election 2020: Montana cannabis legalization guide

An aggressive anti-legalization campaign

Wrong for Montana was launched this September by Steve Zabawa, a Montana car salesman with a long history of opposing cannabis reform in the state. Vitriol against Zabawa is so widespread that a pro-cannabis Facebook group dedicated to boycotting his business has more than 5,000 active members.

Since launching the organization, Zabawa has tried a number of different strategies to attack the legalization initiative. Earlier this month, Wrong for Montana filed a complaint with the state’s Commissioner of Political Practices to require the North Fund, a mysterious 501(c)(4) that has given nearly $5 million to the legalization campaign, to disclose its donors.

Wizards and puppets

In a comment left on the page of a Montana Public Radio story about the donation, Zabawa himself wrote “Why would bring Big Marijuana, The Wizard behind the North Fund’s $4.7 million out of state money and wipe out our current marijuana 260 dispensaries and 38,000 green card holders? The wizard and his three puppets Pepper [Petersen], Dave [Lewis] and Ted [Dick] are selling Montanans out to out of state big money to line their pockets!”

Related

Cannabis cowboys: A 900-mile trip with Montana’s marijuana legalization campaign

Zabawa has additionally argued that the anticipated revenue generated by legal cannabis—an estimated $50 million annually once the program is up and running—is merely a “drop in the bucket.”

“If it was bringing in a billion dollars, OK maybe it’s worth it,” he told Montana Public Radio. “But when it only brings in one little drop into the bucket and you’re creating all these other ills, I don’t think it’s worth it.”

When you’re losing at the polls, file a lawsuit

Wrong for Montana’s lawsuit doesn’t seem to reflect the opinion of most Montanans: a poll released last week by Montana State University concluded that 49% of voters support legalization and 39% are opposed. 

In other words, only 1% of undecided voters need to support the measure for it to pass.

Tax revenue seen as a big plus

Legalization has found widespread support in part because of New Approach Montana’s proposed allocations of the revenue, which is estimated to total $236 million by 2026. The group recommends using half of it to support public lands and environmental restoration projects; the other half would be split equally between the state’s general fund, funding for municipalities that permit cannabis sales, veterans’ services, substance abuse treatment and care services for disabled and elderly Montanans. 

“For decades and decades the public lands and conservation communities have been trying to find places where we have established strings of revenue to fund our public lands,” Montana Conservation Voters Executive Director Aaron Murphy told the Missoulian earlier this month. “When this opportunity came along as a very smart and timely solution to that, these organizations saw all the same things and said, ‘Yeah, we’re going to get behind this.’”

Wasting $11,000 per arrest

This week’s lawsuit comes on the heels of a new study highlighting the absurdity of marijuana arrests in Montana: 99% of arrests involved non-violent offenders, indigenous Montanans were twice as likely to be arrested as their white peers, and Black Montanans were five times more likely to be arrested than white residents.

The study concluded that the state spends nearly $11,000 per arrest.

“It shows that Montana is wasting a lot of tax dollars,” said Petersen, “on something that should have never been illegal in the first place.”

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Max Savage Levenson

Max Savage Levenson likely has the lowest cannabis tolerance of any writer on the cannabis beat. He also writes about music for Pitchfork, Bandcamp and other bespectacled folk. He co-hosts The Hash podcast. His dream interview is Tyler the Creator.

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Source: https://www.leafly.com/news/politics/montana-prohibitionists-ask-supreme-court-to-kick-legalization-off-ballot

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Do you use full or broad spectrum tincture?

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Visit our community site for vetted suppliers at http://theCBD.place. It’s time that this subject was given more internet exposure. We are here to discuss topics related to medical marijuana and our experiences using CBD. Please do not assume that anyone here is a medical professional.

Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/CBD/comments/jfhyrg/do_you_use_full_or_broad_spectrum_tincture/

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