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Reclaim, Reuse and Reap the Rewards

As the use of composite materials continues to grow in many different markets, so does the industry’s search for better ways to recycle its products and reclaim the valuable materials that are locked inside them. Consumer demand is one driver of these recycling efforts. People want to deal with companies that have shown a commitment […]

The post Reclaim, Reuse and Reap the Rewards appeared first on Composites Manufacturing Magazine.

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As the use of composite materials continues to grow in many different markets, so does the industry’s search for better ways to recycle its products and reclaim the valuable materials that are locked inside them.

Consumer demand is one driver of these recycling efforts. People want to deal with companies that have shown a commitment to sustainable operations. “I think the social pressure is increasing to drive behavioral changes in the industry,” says Andrew Maxey, CEO of Vartega. “The consumer is coming to expect it. We are incentivized through public perception to make some changes here.”

There are also sound economic reasons for supporting recycling. Companies can save money by incorporating reclaimed materials into their applications and releasing the production energy stored within them. “The reality is if we’re going to put a lot of energy into producing materials in the first place, there’s no reason not to reclaim or recover the energy the best we can,” says Maxey.

Virgin Properties at Half Price

Colorado-based Vartega has developed a patented process that recovers the carbon fiber from high-grade, pre-impregnated scrap. The thermoset material that is being recycled – uncured prepreg and dry fiber fabrics – comes primarily from the aerospace industry, which has a scrap rate of about 30%.

The typical prepreg contains about 65% carbon fiber, and Vartega is able to recover it all. Its low-temperature dissolution process employs several different process chemistries to wash away the resins in the scraps and remove the original sizing or chemical binder on the carbon fibers. Almost all of the chemicals used in the dissolution process can be recovered and reused again.

The reclaimed carbon fiber has the same properties as the virgin fiber. “Because we are not degrading or damaging the fiber surface at all, we maintain the mechanical properties, including the strength and stiffness of the carbon fiber,” Maxey says. The fiber has high electrical conductivity and minimal thermal expansion as well.

The stringy, recycled carbon fiber that comes out of the process is chopped and consolidated with a compatible binder for thermoplastic compounding. Vartega is concentrating primarily on the thermoplastic market at present, but has produced carbon fiber for non-woven thermosets as well.

Vartega sells its recycled carbon fiber products at about half the cost of those made with virgin material. Right now, the biggest demand is for polypropylene and polyamide carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics, according to Maxey. Customers that use this reclaimed carbon fiber include consumer product companies, sporting goods manufacturers and the automotive industry.

Source: http://compositesmanufacturingmagazine.com/2020/05/reclaim-reuse-and-reap-the-rewards/

Manufacturing

Carbon Fiber Composites Used Inside and Out on MANSORY’s Conversion of the Audi RS Q8

MANSORY followed-up its successful conversion of an Audi RS6 estate car with the conversion of the Audi RS Q8 luxury SUV. The RS Q8 is based on the style of the RS6, with even more aggressive carbon fiber use and styling. MANSORY modified several body parts to include carbon fiber, improving both the aerodynamics and […]

The post Carbon Fiber Composites Used Inside and Out on MANSORY’s Conversion of the Audi RS Q8 appeared first on Composites Manufacturing Magazine.

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MANSORY followed-up its successful conversion of an Audi RS6 estate car with the conversion of the Audi RS Q8 luxury SUV. The RS Q8 is based on the style of the RS6, with even more aggressive carbon fiber use and styling.

MANSORY modified several body parts to include carbon fiber, improving both the aerodynamics and downforce of the vehicle. The front and side skirts of the RS Q8 are now designed of carbon fiber and the rear skirt of the vehicle is finished in visible carbon fiber. The exterior of the SUV is black with red stripes and accents, adding to the sporty look.

The hood of the RS Q8 is also built of carbon fiber. All carbon fiber components of the vehicle are manufactured in MANSORY’s own autoclaves.

The interior of the MANSORY vehicle features the red and black motif as well and carbon fiber trim. Even the steering wheel is wrapped in a leather and carbon fiber hybrid.

As for the powerful engine, the 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 in the RS Q8 features a modified ECU unit and a high-performance exhaust system. With 780 hp, the vehicle accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h in only 3.3 seconds and reaches a top speed of 320 kph.

Tires and wheels measure 10 x 24 and 12.5 x 24 inches with 295/30R24 and 355/25R24 fill the front and rear.  The MANSORY YN.5 forged wheel on the RS Q8 increases stability and improves handling. Y.5 aluminum rims measuring 10.5 x 23 inches are also available.

Source: http://compositesmanufacturingmagazine.com/2020/11/carbon-fiber-composites-used-inside-and-out-on-mansorys-conversion-of-the-audi-rs-q8/

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Manufacturing

10 Tips for Converting a 3D Printer to Pellet Extrusion

Make the switch from extruded filament to closed-loop recycled plastic pellets with these helpful tips

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The post 10 Tips for Converting a 3D Printer to Pellet Extrusion appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

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The Lily pellet extruder on a SmartAlu printer designed by Smartfriendz

This project appears in Make: Vol. 75. Subscribe today for more great projects delivered right to your mailbox.

(Editor’s Note: Check back soon for more of Samer’s Lily testing updates.)

Converting a 3D printer to print directly from pellets requires tradeoffs: you’ll gain the ability to reuse plastic material in exchange for some performance limitations. Done carefully, these modifications will open the door to closed-loop recycling, economical pellet feedstock ($2–$5/kg), custom material blends, colors, and properties — but they could reduce the usable print volume and require slower print speeds due to the toolhead’s weight. Ten things to consider:

1. Can the carriage handle the weight and dimensions of the pellet extruder and hot end? Consult your vendor(s). We mounted the Lily pellet extruder on a SmartAlu printer designed by Smartfriendz.

2. Obtain a copy of the firmware on your printer — you may need to modify it. A lot of modifications can be stored in your slicer profile, but various offsets may have to be changed in firmware.

3. Your Z-axis endstop may have to move if the pellet extruder has a long hot end (the Lily does).

4. If you use a BLTouch or induction sensor for bed leveling, you might have to redesign a new X-carriage to accommodate these elements.

5. If possible, make the conversion on a secondary printer in case you need your main printer to prototype parts.

6. Decide how you will feed the pellet extruder. If you’re using a gravity feeder, the hopper has to be above the printer. The Lily pushes filament through a PTFE tube using air, so the pellets or shreds can be fed from any level.

7. While V-wheels are great, expect wear to increase with the heavier head. Consider upgrading at least the X-axis to use a linear rail.

8. If your kit comes with a MOSFET, use it. Running the pellet extruder may consume more power than your printer’s original design. Make sure your power supply can support the additional load.

9. Once it’s all installed, you’ll want to experiment with different materials to determine optimal print speeds, jerk settings, and retraction rates.

10. Expect to tune your PID values to suit your extruder. Recycl3D provided me with a baseline set of numbers and I tuned accordingly.

Whatever extruder you choose, seek support from your vendor, as this is a non-trivial endeavor. They’ll have complete details — Recycl3D was in close contact throughout my Lily installation over several weeks. Of course, if you’re using a DIY pellet extruder, the same checklist applies, but otherwise you’re on your own. You can find many #pelletextruder sources on YouTube, Thingiverse, and other sites.

Source: https://makezine.com/2020/11/25/10-tips-for-converting-a-3d-printer-to-pellet-extrusion/

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Manufacturing

Plan C Live: Mind The Mask

This long holiday weekend is expected to challenge everyone’s resolve to stay safe.  We talk with Sabrina Paseman of FixtheMask.com about wearing masks, which types of masks work best, and which do not offer the best protection from COVID-19. We’ll also talk about why masks remain the best defense against […]

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The post Plan C Live: Mind The Mask appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

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This long holiday weekend is expected to challenge everyone’s resolve to stay safe.  We talk with Sabrina Paseman of FixtheMask.com about wearing masks, which types of masks work best, and which do not offer the best protection from COVID-19. We’ll also talk about why masks remain the best defense against COVID-19 and what kind of offense it is for people not to wear them.   Whether at a family gathering or while shopping on Black Friday, wearing a mask should be considered a civic duty, an obligation to protect yourself and others.

Date: Wednesday, November 25th @ 2:30pm PT / 5:30pm ET.

Join in the conversation or ask questions on Zoom or tune in on Facebook.

Sabrina Paseman is the CEO of Fix The Mask and a former Product Design Engineer at Apple. She holds a M.Eng in Mechanical Engineering from Cornell University. Through Fix The Mask she and her team are committed to providing fixes comfortable, affordable, accessible, and backed by data. Their mission is predicated on the idea that safety is a human right. The pandemic has shed light on the flaws of our healthcare system. PPE scarcity, misinformation, and price-gouging are all exacerbated by wealth inequality, racism, and systemic inefficiencies. Fix The Mask is committed to providing well-fitted masks for everyone and being an inspiration for the type of progress that can be achieved in a world of increasingly complex problems.

You can find the Surgical Mask Brace for purchase at FixThe Mask.com or check out Sabrina’s tips on creating your own.

Source: https://makezine.com/2020/11/24/plan-c-live-mind-the-mask/

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