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New Year’s Resolution > Live Stronger, Heal Faster with CBD

Every New Year’s Eve, many people around the world come up with a resolution to lead a healthy lifestyle and do something about their fitness. During the holiday season (from Christmas through the New Year), people tend to spend more time with their family, meaning that the focus is not […]

The post New Year’s Resolution > Live Stronger, Heal Faster with CBD appeared first on Root Origins.

Republished by Plato

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Every New Year’s Eve, many people around the world come up with a resolution to lead a healthy lifestyle and do something about their fitness. During the holiday season (from Christmas through the New Year), people tend to spend more time with their family, meaning that the focus is not on their workouts. An occasional cheat day is a completely normal thing, but during the holiday season, there’s a lot of food, so cheat days can easily turn into cheat weeks. All the work you’ve done to get in shape gets thrown away, but the worst part is that your motivation to stay fit might diminish.

It All Begins with Nutrition

Reducing calorie intake and proper diet is a good starting point. Most people are so busy that they don’t have time to work out while reducing their caloric intake. Even if you manage to hit the gym every day, you won’t see many results if your caloric intake isn’t in a deficit.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol earned its bad reputation from misinterpreted studies that were conducted from the 1950s to 1970s. The research results showed that raised cholesterol levels from a high intake of saturated animal fats are associated with higher rates of heart disease. Since then, it has been the biggest nutritional outcast. Recent studies point out that a healthy amount of cholesterol intake keeps the hormones balanced. Increasing your testosterone levels is a great way to burn excess fat (in combination with exercise), and you can do it by consuming cholesterol.

Carbohydrates

Unlike any other foods with carbohydrates, whole grains offer everything you need when your body is stressed due to strenuous workouts. They are high in fiber and nutrients, support healthy digestion, and reduce chronic inflammation. Also, a small amount of whole grains will prevent you from eating more because they will keep you fuller for longer.

Paleo, Keto, and All Plant-Based Diet

If you’re considering starting a paleo diet, you should know that it is not safe for everyone (doctors don’t know its effects on older adults, pregnant women, or children). Paleo diet involves eating foods that prehistoric people used to gather or hunt. It focuses on vegetables and fruits, fish, lean meat, herbs, eggs, herbs, and spices. Eliminating processed foods and added sugar, reducing calorie intake, increased protein consumption, and can lead to significant weight loss and health improvements.

When following a keto diet, you limit your carb intake to less than 10% of your total daily calorie intake. That way, you allow your body to enter the state of ketosis when your body switches to burning fat for fuel. Keto diet includes foods such as meat and poultry, low carb vegetables, seafood, cheese, eggs, avocados, olive oil, coconut oil, nuts and seeds, butter and cream, berries, and dark chocolate.

An all plant-based diet focuses on consuming foods primarily from plants. It includes vegetables and fruits, but also whole grains, legumes, oils, seeds, nuts, and beans. Great plant foods to eat before and after training are whole grains, fresh fruits, dried fruit, potatoes, large salads, veggie burgers, smoothies, etc.

What to Include in Your Diet

  • No more sugar-loaded foods and beverages, such as fruit juices and sodas, snack foods, sugar-loaded sauces, flavored coffee, canned fruit, etc. Cut out as much sugar as you can.
  • When consuming carbs, only eat whole grains.
  • Drink more water – if you’re exercising and dieting daily, you must stay hydrated.

The human body needs to get enough nutrients, minerals, and vitamins to use as fuel, or it will keep holding the fat as a source of necessary fuel. Once you eat well and drink enough water, your body will begin to shed the excess fat.

CBD and Its Benefits with Recovery

Rest and recovery days are essential to one’s fitness for both psychological and physiological reasons. During rest, muscles get the chance to repair, rebuild, and strengthen. After a daily workout or a whole day of being active, you will feel that muscle soreness that can impact your ability to keep going. CBD is known to have anti-inflammatory properties and can help you improve your post-workout recovery. In 2018, Frontiers in Neurology published a review of 132 original studies conducted with CBD. It has shown that CBD can help improve mobility and pain and reduce inflammation in patients with multiple sclerosis. It is neuroprotective, antipsychotic, antiemetic, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory.

The best time to start getting back in shape is now. Be consistent and be prepared to stick it out, and all the hard work will be worth it.

Source: https://www.rootorigins.com/new-years-resolution-live-stronger-heal-faster-with-cbd/

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USDA Final Rule on Hemp

The post USDA Final Rule on Hemp appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.

Republished by Plato

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USDA Final RuleUSDA Final Rule on Hemp was finally released on January 15, 2021 based on the previous set of USDA hemp regulations that drew public comments from almost 6,000 people. USDA Final Rule on Hemp will be effective on March 22, and is currently available for viewing in the Federal Register.

This time, the latest USDA Final Rule on Hemp makes several highly praised changes, superseding the DEA interim final rule (IFR), that are seen as favorable to both hemp producers and regulatory authorities.

Although contentious aspects of the IFR remain, industry members are hopeful they will be amended in time, and this could represent a new era of more industry friendly regulations.

RELATED POST: Is Delta-8 Legal?

RELATED POST: DEA Hemp Rule (IFR)

What Does USDA Final Hemp Regulations Say

This USDA Final Rule on Hemp includes regulations to approve plans submitted by States and Indian Tribes for the domestic production of hemp. This rule also includes regulations on the Federal hemp production plan for producers in States or territories of Indian Tribes that do not have their own USDA-approved plans.

 The program provides requirements for maintaining records about the land where hemp is produced, testing the levels of total delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, disposing of non-compliant plants, licensing hemp producers, and ensuring compliance under the new program.

The USDA Final Hemp Regulations on Sampling

The USDA Final Rule on Hemp made several changes to sampling that should reduce burdens on both growers and authorities.

After many public comments stating that 15 days was far too little time to collect an appropriate amount of samples from each producer in the state, the rule increased the sampling window. Samples for testing now need to be taken up to 30 days before a farmer plans to harvest.

The rule also slightly modified from where on the plant samples need to be taken. While the IFR required collecting a sample from the top third portion of the plant, USDA Final Rule on Hemp determines samples should be taken “approximately five to eight inches from the ‘main stem’, ‘terminal bud’, or ‘central cola’ of the flowering top of the plant.”

This will allow sampling agents to collect more stem and leaf material than previously allowed and reduce instances of hot crop, given that  stems and leaves typically contain lower levels of cannabinoids, and THC, than the flowers.

Sampling protocols may take into account:

  • seed certification processes that identify varieties that have consistently produced compliant hemp plants;
  • whether the producer is conducting research on hemp at an institution of higher learning or that is funded by a federal, state or tribal government;
  • whether a producer has consistently produced compliant hemp plants over an extended period of time;
  • whether a producer is growing “immature” hemp, such as seedlings, clones, microgreens or other non-flowering cannabis, that does not reach the flowering stage;

SamplingGuidelinesforHemp

 

The USDA Final Hemp Regulations on Testing

Unfortunately, The USDA Final Rule was not as generous answering one of the most highly requested changes in public comments: increasing the limit of THC on hemp. The final rule retains that hemp must remain below 0.3% total THC on a dry-weight basis.

Total THC is defined as the sum of the delta-9 THC and tetrahydrocannabinolic acid. On its own, tetrahydrocannabinolic does not produce psychoactive effects like delta-9 THC, but it can be converted to THC through decarboxylation, which is the process required for testing.

While the final rule implemented generally positive sampling changes for the industry, THC testing will, for the most part, remain burdensome. 

The USDA was unable to change the limit previously established, as that limit was written into law in the 2018 Farm Bill.

However, legislation has already been introduced at the federal level by Sen. Rand Paul to amend that limit to 1%, which would finally put an end to the total THC versus delta-9-THC debate.

Another burdenson regulation that was heavily criticized in the public comments was the requirement for labs testing hemp to be registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

“Although AMS received comments in opposition to this requirement, AMS is retaining the requirement in this final rule that any laboratory testing hemp for purposes of regulatory compliance must be registered with DEA to conduct chemical analysis of controlled substances… ,” the final rule states. “Registration is necessary because laboratories could potentially handle cannabis that tests above 0.3 percent THC on a dry weight basis, which is, by definition, marijuana and a Schedule 1 controlled substance.”

 The USDA announced the delay of the requirement for labs to be registered by the DEA back in 2020, along with others outlined in the IFR, that delay was extended under the USDA Final Rule until December 2022. There is no need to read too much into the situation, but it could mean some acknowledged that those provisions are not necessarily right.

One very positive change made by the USDA Final Rule on the testing front: The negligence threshold was raised from 0.5% to 1%, which means if hemp tests above 0.3% but below 1%, it will still need to be disposed of or remediated, but will not be considered a negligent violation 

  • Those with crops testing at or above 1% THC will receive a Notice of Violation from the USDA
  • Producers with more than three negligent violations within a five-year period will be ineligible to participate in the licensed hemp program for the next five years.
  • Producers are only subject to a maximum of one negligent violation per year, even if their hemp from multiple lots tests up to 1% THC.

If hemp does test “hot” above the 0.3% THC limit, the final rule has given producers additional options for disposal beyond the total destruction written into the IFR.

States now have several options for more productive and less wasteful methods of disposal that can result in useful soil amendments. Those include:

  • plowing under
  • mulching/composting the hemp
  • disking
  • shredding the biomass with a bush mower or chopper.

Producers may also bury or burn their hot hemp. (The AMS implemented these additional options in early 2020, but they were not written into the IFR.)

The final rule implements a brand-new option for hot crops: remediation.

The rule states producers can remediate their material by “removing and destroying flower material, while retaining stalk, stems, leaf material, and seeds.” Producers may also shred the entire plant to create a “biomass-like material” and then retest it for compliance.

Producers also no longer need to use a DEA-registered distributor or law enforcement to dispose of hot hemp.

USDA Final Rule on Hemp and Remediation

The IFR did not provide additional remediation options. The only alternative was to completely dispose of the non-compliant material. This time the final rule implements a brand-new option for hot crops: remediation, mentioning that alternative 82 times throughout the document 

The rule states producers can remediate their material by “removing and destroying flower material, while retaining stalk, stems, leaf material, and seeds.” Producers may also shred the entire plant to create a “biomass-like material” and then retest it for compliance, giving them the opportunity to remediate non-compliant crops in order to minimize financial risk associated with the loss of investment in their hemp crop

Producers also no longer need to use a DEA-registered distributor or law enforcement to dispose of hot hemp.

SamplingGuidelinesforHemp

States now have several options for more productive and less wasteful methods of disposal that can result in useful soil amendments. Those include:

  • plowing under
  • mulching/composting the hemp
  • disking
  • shredding the biomass with a bush mower or chopper.

USDA Final Hemp Rule on WIPHE

The 2018 Farm Bill directed USDA to establish a national regulatory framework for hemp production in the U.S., and the final rule outlines provisions for this mandate. The IFR and this final rule do not cover hemp or its products beyond production. Further, DEA has issued regulations covering some of these products or “in-process materials”. Accordingly, this final rule does not address “in-process materials,” processors, end-products, processing of CBD or other cannabinoids or anything that may contain hemp or hemp byproducts.

Don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

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Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at lauryn@cannabislegalizationnews.com.

How to get a Michigan Dispensary License

How to get a Michigan Dispensary License  A Michigan Dispensary License is a legal document that allows its holder to possess, store, test, sell, transfer purchase or transport marijuana to or from a marijuana establishment, whose primary aim would be to sell…

New York Small Business Cooperative License

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Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

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New York Cannabis Dispensary License

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New York’s Cannabis Cultivation License

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316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
Peoria, Illinois 61602

Phone: (309) 740-4033 || Email:  tom@collateralbase.com


316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
Peoria, Illinois 61602

Phone: (309) 740-4033 || Email:  tom@collateralbase.com

cannabis industry lawyer

316 SW Washington St,Peoria,
IL 61602, USA
Call Us (309) 740-4033 || e-Mail Us tom@collateralbase.com

Source: https://www.cannabisindustrylawyer.com/usda-final-rule-on-hemp/

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How to get a Michigan Dispensary License

The post How to get a Michigan Dispensary License appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.

Republished by Plato

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Michigan Dispensary LicenseA Michigan Dispensary License is a legal document that allows its holder to possess, store, test, sell, transfer purchase or transport marijuana to or from a marijuana establishment, whose primary aim would be to sell marijuana products to individuals that are 21 years old or older.

In that sense, getting a dispensary license should be your top priority if you want to enter the adult-use cannabis industry in Michigan.

Below, you’ll find the answers to many questions regarding how to get a dispensary license in Michigan, what’s the cost of getting a Michigan dispensary license, and what do you need in order to apply for one.

How to get a Michigan dispensary license

Michigan works with a “two-step” program, in which you’d need to prequalify to get a Michigan marijuana license, and then get licensing qualification. If you want to know more about the process of prequalification in Michigan, you might want to check our ‘How To Get Prequalified for a Michigan Marijuana License’ post.

A Michigan dispensary license prequalification involves quite a bit of audit of the applicant’s financial and operational history, as well as relevant information such as data of all significant stakeholders and their spouses. Applicants undergoing the prequalification process will be required to collect, process, and submit a significant amount of information to the Michigan Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA).

Once you and any supplemental applicant complete the prequalification process, you’ll be able to move to the second step of the Michigan marijuana licensing process: licensing qualification, which includes the review of the proposed retail establishment, including a physical inspection, as well as payment of the licensure fee once approved.

Business owners that would like to acquire a Michigan dispensary license will need to submit an application and pay the licensing fees. You can check the application resources and download application forms at the MRA’s adult-use marijuana application page.

Michigan Dispensary License Requirements

According to the latest legislation on the matter, each applicant has to disclose the identity of any other person who has control whether directly or indirectly over the applicant, including –but not limited to- date of birth, government-issued identification, and any other documents required by the agency.

As well, the applicant will have to provide:

  • Financial statements
  • Property ownership information, including deeds, leases, rental agreements, real estate trusts or purchase agreements.
  • Tax information
  • Disclosure of the applicant of the identity of people who control –directly or indirectly- or are controlled by the applicant.
  • Disclosure of all shareholders holding a direct or indirect interest of greater than 5%, as well as officers and directors of the proposed marijuana facility
  • The sources and the total amount of the applicant’s capitalization to operate and maintain the marijuana facility.
  • A financial statement attested by a certified public accountant.
  • Information on the financial ability of the applicant to purchase and maintain adequate liability and casualty insurance.
  • Any other disclosure or requirement requested by the MRA

Another requirement you need to provide in order to complete the application process is a description of the type of marijuana business that includes:

  • An estimate or the actual number of employees
  • The projected or actual gross receipts
  • A business plan
  • The proposed location for the marijuana business
  • A security plan
  • A copy of the proposed marijuana business location plan

After all of this, the applicant has to confirm that he is in compliance with any municipal ordinance that its municipality may have adopted under the medical marijuana facilities licensing act, or the Michigan regulation and taxation of marijuana act.

If the MRA identifies a deficiency in the application, it will have to notify the applicant and the applicant must submit the missing information or proof that the deficiency has been corrected to the agency within 5 days of the date the applicant received the deficiency notice.  If the applicant doesn’t correct the deficiency, the agency will deny its application.

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A MARIJUANA DISPENSARY IN MICHIGAN

RELATED POST: HOW TO GET A COMMERCIAL GROWERS LICENSE IN MICHIGAN

How much is a Michigan dispensary license 

Take into consideration that some types of applicants may qualify for reduced application fees, such as social-equity applicants.  However, the fees of getting a Michigan dispensary license can be steep. The application fee must be submitted before an application can be processed and is usually $6,000 for a state license.

There are also municipal licensing fees that must be paid to most cities where facilities are permitted to be located. Most municipalities charge a $5,000.00 non-refundable fee, though there are some that charge less.

This obviously doesn’t include additional costs such as renewal fees, the three percent tax on the dispensary’s gross retail receipts, and –maybe even more important- the costs of investigation and processing during the application process, needed in order to get the license.

Further, you will need real estate, which has to meet zone requirements. There are laws in Michigan that place restrictions on where you can open a retail marijuana dispensary. If you’re unsure whether your location is appropriate for the venture, make sure to seek guidance and contact a professional.

Under state law, no marijuana retail establishment can be located in an area specifically zoned for residential use.  Additionally, a marijuana dispensary can’t be opened within 1,000 feet of any school that accommodates grades K-12. 

Local municipalities may reduce the distance requirement or impose other location requirements as they see fit. What this means is: you have to check with your local authorities if it’s allowed to open a business in your municipality.

You’ll also need to have the capital for your operation, for which it’s recommended budgeting for at least $500,000 to be on the safe side. It may seem like much, but the state won’t give a license to a business that they consider likely to flop. 

So, you would probably need to look for investors, because no bank or financial institution is going to lay a finger in any cannabis business until federal legalization occurs. 

In order to raise money, we’d recommend checking our startup bundle package, which provides your team an application-ready business plan, a pitch deck in order to secure investors, and a fundraising suite to legally raise money to use in your application.

Ineligibility for a Michigan dispensary license

A Michigan dispensary license applications will be declared ineligible if any of the following circumstances exist:

  • The applicant has a prior conviction that involved the distribution of a controlled substance to a minor.
  • The applicant has knowingly submitted an application for a state license under the Michigan regulation and taxation act that contains false information
  • The applicant is an employee, advisor, or consultant of the agency involved in the implementation, administration, or enforcement of the Michigan regulation and taxation of marihuana act
  • The applicant holds an elective office of a governmental unit of Michigan, another state, or the federal government; is a member of or employed by a regulatory body of a governmental unit in Michigan, another state, or the federal government; or is employed by a governmental unit of Michigan. This subdivision does not apply to an elected officer of or employee of a federally recognized Indian tribe or to an elected precinct delegate.
  • The applicant does not hold a state operating license pursuant to the MMFLA and is applying for a marihuana retailer license under the Michigan regulation and taxation of marihuana act and the marijuana facility/establishment administrative rules on licensing published by the MRA.
  • The agency determines the municipality in which the applicant’s proposed marihuana establishment will operate has adopted an ordinance that prohibits marihuana establishments or that the proposed establishment is noncompliant with an ordinance adopted by the municipality under section 6 of the Michigan regulation and taxation of marihuana act
  • The applicant will hold an ownership interest in both a marihuana safety compliance facility or in a marihuana secure transporter and in a marihuana grower, a marihuana processor, a marihuana retailer, or a marihuana microbusiness
  • The applicant will hold an ownership interest in both a marihuana microbusiness and in a marihuana grower, a marihuana processor, a marihuana retailer, a marihuana safety compliance facility, or a marihuana secure transporter
  • The applicant will hold an ownership interest in more than 5 marihuana growers or in more than 1 marihuana microbusiness
  • The applicant fails to meet other criteria established in the rules enacted by the MRA.

The MRA will also take into consideration deciding whether or not to grant a license the following:

  • Whether the applicant has convictions involving dishonesty, theft, or fraud, which indicates that e the proposed marihuana establishment is unlikely to be operated with honesty and integrity.
  • Whether the applicant has been served with a complaint or other notice filed with any public body regarding payment of any tax required under federal, state, or local law that has been delinquent for 1 or more years.
  • Whether the applicant has a history of noncompliance with any regulatory requirements, all legal judgments, lawsuits, legal proceedings, charges, or government investigations, whether initiated, pending, or concluded, against the applicant, that are related to business operations, including, but not limited to fraud, environmental, food safety, labor, employment, worker’s compensation, discrimination, and tax laws and regulations, in Michigan or any other jurisdiction
  • Whether the applicant meets other standards in rules applicable to the state license category.
  •  

Don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

Check Out:

Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at lauryn@cannabislegalizaitonnews.com

New York Small Business Cooperative License

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Thomas Howard

Thomas Howard

Cannabis Lawyer

Thomas Howard has been in business for years and can help yours navigate towards more profitable waters.

New York Cannabis Delivery License

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New York Cannabis Microbusiness License

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New York Cannabis Dispensary License

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New York’s Cannabis Cultivation License

New York Cannabis Cultivation License The New York Cannabis Cultivation License is one of the ten types of licenses included in the newest proposed legislation. This may be the year for New York’s marijuana legalization. On January 6, Bill S854 was presented to the…

Cannabis license: what would you need in order to apply for one?

Nowadays, the Cannabis industry is expanding at an extremely fast rate. And as more states are creating laws that allow businesses to legally produce and sell cannabis products, just getting to apply for a cannabis license may get confusing. A cannabis license is a…


316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
Peoria, Illinois 61602

Phone: (309) 740-4033 || Email:  tom@collateralbase.com


316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
Peoria, Illinois 61602

Phone: (309) 740-4033 || Email:  tom@collateralbase.com

cannabis industry lawyer

316 SW Washington St,Peoria,
IL 61602, USA
Call Us (309) 740-4033 || e-Mail Us tom@collateralbase.com

Source: https://www.cannabisindustrylawyer.com/how-to-get-a-michigan-dispensary-license/

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Aurora Cannabis Inc. Announces US$125 Million Bought Deal Financing

Aurora Cannabis Inc. (“Aurora” or the “Company”) has announced today that it has entered into an agreement with a syndicate of underwriters led by BMO Capital Markets and ATB Capital Markets, under which the underwriters have agreed to buy on bought deal basis 12,000,000 units of the Company (the “Units”), at a price of US$10.45 […]

The post Aurora Cannabis Inc. Announces US$125 Million Bought Deal Financing appeared first on Technical420.

Republished by Plato

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Aurora Cannabis Inc. (“Aurora” or the “Company”) has announced today that it has entered into an agreement with a syndicate of underwriters led by BMO Capital Markets and ATB Capital Markets, under which the underwriters have agreed to buy on bought deal basis 12,000,000 units of the Company (the “Units”), at a price of US$10.45 per Unit for gross proceeds of approximately US$125 million (the “Offering”). Each Unit will be comprised of one common share of the Company (a “Common Share”) and one half of one common share purchase warrant of the Company (each full common share purchase warrant, a “Warrant”). Each Warrant will be exercisable to acquire one common share of the Company (a “Warrant Share”) for a period of 36 months following the closing date of the Offering at an exercise price of US$12.60 per Warrant Share, subject to adjustment in certain events.

The Company has granted the Underwriters an option, exercisable at the offering price for a period of 30 days following the closing of the Offering, to purchase up to an additional 10% of the Offering to cover over-allotments, if any. This option may be exercised by the Underwriters for additional Units, Common Shares, Warrants or any combination of such securities.

The net proceeds of the offering will be used for general corporate purposes, which may include opportunistically reducing debt. The Company believes that the Offering fits with its broader strategy to have a strong balance sheet while maintaining maximum flexibility to invest and build towards being a leader in global cannabinoids.

The closing of the Offering is expected to take place on or about January 26, 2021 and will be subject to customary conditions, including approvals of the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange.

A prospectus supplement (the “Prospectus Supplement”) to the Company’s short form base shelf prospectus dated October 28, 2020 (the “Base Shelf Prospectus”) will be filed with the securities commissions or securities regulatory authorities in each of the provinces of Canada, except Quebec, and with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) as part of the Company’s registration statement on Form F-10 (the “Registration Statement”) under the U.S./Canada Multijurisdictional Disclosure System. The Prospectus Supplement, the Base Shelf Prospectus and the Registration Statement contain important detailed information about the Company and the proposed Offering. Prospective investors should read the Prospectus Supplement, the Base Shelf Prospectus and the Registration Statement and the other documents the Company has filed for more complete information about the Company and this Offering before making an investment decision.

Copies of the Prospectus Supplement, following filing thereof, and the Base Shelf Prospectus will be available on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and copies of the Prospectus Supplement and the Registration Statement will be available on EDGAR at www.sec.gov . Copies of the Prospectus Supplement, following filing thereof, the Base Shelf Prospectus and the Registration Statement may also be obtained from BMO Capital Markets by contacting BMO Capital Markets, Brampton Distribution Centre C/O The Data Group of Companies, 9195 Torbram Road, Brampton, Ontario, L6S 6H2 or by telephone at (905) 791-3151 Ext 431 or by email at torbramwarehouse@datagroup.ca or from BMO Capital Markets Corp., Attn: Equity Syndicate Department, 3 Times Square, 25th Floor, New York, NY 10036 (Attn: Equity Syndicate), or by telephone at (800) 414-3627 or by email atbmoprospectus@bmo.com . Copies of such documents may also be obtained from ATB Capital Markets Inc., Attn: Gail O’Connor, 410-585 8th Ave SW, Calgary, Alberta, T2P 1G1, (403) 539-8629 or by email from atbcm_dealflow@atb.com .

No securities regulatory authority has either approved or disapproved of the contents of this press release. This press release is for information purposes only and shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such state or jurisdiction.

About Aurora

Aurora is a global leader in the cannabis industry serving both the medical and consumer markets. Headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta, Aurora is a pioneer in global cannabis dedicated to helping people improve their lives. The Company’s brand portfolio includes Aurora, Aurora Drift, San Rafael ‘71, Daily Special, AltaVie, MedReleaf, CanniMed, Whistler, and Reliva CBD. Providing customers with innovative, high-quality cannabis products, Aurora’s brands continue to break through as industry leaders in the medical, performance, wellness and recreational markets wherever they are launched. For more information, please visit our website at www.auroramj.com .

Aurora’s common shares trade on the TSX and NYSE under the symbol “ACB”, and is a constituent of the S&P/TSX Composite Index.

Further Information

For Media: For Investors:
Michelle Lefler ICR, Inc.
VP, Communications & PR Investor Relations
media@auroramj.com aurora@icrinc.com

Forward Looking Statements

This news release includes statements containing certain “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable securities law (“forward-looking statements “). Forward-looking statements are frequently characterized by words such as “plan”, “continue”, “expect”, “project”, “intend”, “believe”, “anticipate”, “estimate”, “may”, “will”, “potential”, “proposed” and other similar words, or statements that certain events or conditions “may” or “will” occur. Forward-looking statements made in this news release include statements regarding: the timing and completion of the Offering and the expected use of proceeds of the Offering. These forward-looking statements are only predictions. Various assumptions were used in drawing the conclusions or making the projections contained in the forward-looking statements throughout this news release. Forward looking statements are based on the opinions, estimates and assumptions of management in light of management’s experience and perception of historical trends, current conditions and expected developments at the date the statements are made, such as current and future market conditions, the ability to maintain SG&A costs in line with current expectations, the ability to achieve high margin revenues in the Canadian consumer market, the current and future regulatory environment and future approvals and permits. Forward-looking statements are subject to a variety of risks, uncertainties and other factors that management believes to be relevant and reasonable in the circumstances could cause actual events, results, level of activity, performance, prospects, opportunities or achievements to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements, including the risks associated with: entering the U.S. market, the ability to realize the anticipated benefits associated with the acquisition of Reliva, achievement of Aurora’s business transformation plan, general business and economic conditions, changes in laws and regulations, product demand, changes in prices of required commodities, competition, the effects of and responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and other risks, uncertainties and factors set out under the heading “Risk Factors” in the Company’s annual information form dated September 24, 2020 (the “ AIF ”) and filed with Canadian securities regulators available on the Company’s issuer profile on SEDAR at www.sedar.com and filed with and available on the SEC’s website at www.edgar.gov. The Company cautions that the list of risks, uncertainties and other factors described in the AIF is not exhaustive and other factors could also adversely affect its results. Readers are urged to consider the risks, uncertainties and assumptions carefully in evaluating the forward-looking statements and are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such information. The Company is under no obligation, and expressly disclaims any intention or obligation, to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as expressly required by applicable securities law.


Primary Logo Source: https://technical420.com/cannabis-article/aurora-cannabis-inc-announces-us125-million-bought-deal-financing/

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