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How to Make an Informed Decision When Buying CBD

With the recent legalization of hemp, the CBD market is on the upswing. Forecasts show that by 2025, CBD sales in the United States will reach $15 billion, spreading to as high as $20B. These numbers take into account both products being sold through licensed dispensaries, as well as general […]

The post How to Make an Informed Decision When Buying CBD appeared first on Root Origins.

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With the recent legalization of hemp, the CBD market is on the upswing. Forecasts show that by 2025, CBD sales in the United States will reach $15 billion, spreading to as high as $20B. These numbers take into account both products being sold through licensed dispensaries, as well as general market retailers such as pharmacies, stores, smoke shops, and cafes. Nevertheless, forecasters predict that the majority of CBD products will sell through general retail stores (online and offline) instead of cannabis dispensaries.

Today, people can go online and choose from hundreds of different brands and dozens of different types of products such as CBD oil, cream, spray, beverage, sublingual, and more. While having more options is generally good; there are some drawbacks. It is particularly true with a relatively new industry such as the CBD market.

It will take some time before this industry will be fully regulated and supervised, meaning that there’s still a door open for many flagrant con artists to sell sub-par products disguised as the real thing. As such, customers will have a tough time differentiating high-quality from low-quality and will need to be made aware of the potential risks as well as how to make an informed decision whenever they make a purchase.

This will not only help prevent people from wasting money on low-quality but can also help prevent them from putting their own health at risk due to the potentially unsafe ingredients of the product. It’s for this reason why consumers need to know what to look out for when buying CBD. Below are some tips for choosing the right CBD products that will best suit your needs.

Hemp or Marijuana CBD

When looking to buy CBD, consumers need to know that it can be made from either hemp or marijuana. Both plants are part of the cannabis family but with a significant difference. Hemp has much higher levels of CBD and lower levels of THC (the active compound known for its psychoactive effects – the feeling of high). Marijuana, on the other hand, is the opposite.

Keep in mind that federal law requires hemp and CBD products have a THC concentration no higher than 0.3%. Marijuana and marijuana-derived CBD products are highly regulated, and you can only purchase through dispensaries where legal. Hemp CBD, however, is federally legal, with its exact legal status depending on the state.

That said, you need to know what you require and be aware that marijuana CBD products can have psychoactive effects. Taking this type of CBD can result in a positive drug test. Athletes or those undergoing regular drug screening tests, in particular, should stick only to hemp-based CBD products.

Checking the Label

According to a study called “Labeling Accuracy of Cannabidiol Extracts Sold Online,” just 31% of CBD products analyzed were accurately labeled. A great way to understand the quality of the product you are about to buy is to check its COA (Certificate of Analysis). Here, you’ll find details regarding the CBD source, its quality, composition, potency, solvents used, microbial analysis, the testing done for heavy metals, fungicides, herbicides, pesticides, etc. All reputable and trustworthy CBD companies will publish their COA.

If there’s no COA, if its barebones, or looks like it’s been tampered with, it’s best that you pass on that product. Without this certification, you risk buying and consuming a fraudulent product packed with all sorts of toxins.

Keep in mind that some companies provide these reports after purchase or if by a submitted formal request. These reports are issued by third-party laboratories that, themselves, should be ISO-certified. In any case, COA reports should not only match the ingredients and quantities present on the label but also determine any existing harmful contaminants such as heavy metals or microbial contaminants like mold or bacteria. These receive a Pass or Fail mark based on established safe limits. Lastly, the COA report needs to be recent, meaning no older than one year.

Seed to Shelf Traceability

While some CBD brands hold close ties with their hemp farmers or CBD isolate suppliers, others do not. Even new companies with good intentions but limited CBD knowledge can be fooled into thinking that they’re dealing with premium suppliers when, in fact, they are not.

There are two areas here that need particular attention: sourcing and cultivation practices.

  • Sourcing – The international CBD market isn’t as regulated, and it’s hard to keep track of product origins. It’s for this reason you should purchase CBD products originating from recognized regions. Hemp can be sourced from numerous places including, China, Europe, or the United States. Also know that cannabis plants, hemp included, suck everything out from the ground, good or bad. The US has a nutrient-rich soil as well as superior cultivation standards, making it the best geographical location for hemp cultivation. In the US, the states with the best soil and standards are Oregon, South Carolina, Kentucky, and Colorado.
  • Cultivation Practices – Second, are the cultivation practices used to produce the hemp. It includes things such as seed sourcing from accredited collectives, abstaining from the use of pesticides, GMOs, proper maintenance of soil pH, etc. This information may be difficult to track, but if a company readily discloses it and their sources, it’s a good sign. The best scenario is when the company owns the farm and can oversee the whole seed to shelf process. 

The Brand’s Reputation

Another thing to look out for online is the brand’s reputation. What do other consumers say about their experience with that brand and product? How are their reviews? Are there any alarming complaints or praise from their customers? While this information alone will not guarantee the quality of a product, it will provide you with some useful insights into what you can expect.

Conclusion

CBD products are known for their many health benefits. That said, not all CBD is the same, and you need to know what to look out for and make an informed decision. For more information, feel free to check out our website or email us at info@rootorigins.com.

Source: https://www.rootorigins.com/how-to-make-an-informed-decision-when-buying-cbd/

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Auxly Cannabis – The Clear Cut Way To Play Canadian Cannabis 2.0

The legalization of cannabis derivative products in late 2019 by Health Canada is proving to be a major value drive for companies that are levered to the burgeoning vertical and is a trend that we are bullish on. Many brokerage firms and research analysts refer to this era of the industry as cannabis 2.0 and […]

The post Auxly Cannabis – The Clear Cut Way To Play Canadian Cannabis 2.0 appeared first on Technical420.

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The legalization of cannabis derivative products in late 2019 by Health Canada is proving to be a major value drive for companies that are levered to the burgeoning vertical and is a trend that we are bullish on.

Many brokerage firms and research analysts refer to this era of the industry as cannabis 2.0 and we consider this vertical to be one of the most exciting aspects of the Canadian cannabis industry.

One of the biggest surprise winners of the Canadian cannabis 2.0 market has been Auxly Cannabis Group Inc. (TSX.V – XLY) (CBWTF), a leading consumer packaged goods (CPG) company in the cannabis products market.

Last week, Auxly reported a major milestone and announced that it had the largest market share of cannabis 2.0 products in 2020. The data was confirmed by Headset Canadian Insights data which is considered to be a leading data aggregator for the legal cannabis industry. We consider this to be a major achievement for Auxly and is a development that captured our attention.

According to Headset Canadian Insights, Auxly had a 19.2% share of the total vape market and a 12% share of the total edibles market. These two market segments were significant enough for Auxly to capture the largest amount of market share and we expect the company to launch new cannabis 2.0 products this year.

The performance of Auxly’s vape products in 2020 was impressive and was the best performing segment of the business. According to Headset Canadian Insights, Auxly had 23% of the national vape market share in the fourth quarter and we will monitor how the trend continues in future quarters.

With these results, Auxly has proven its ability to execute on the cannabis 2.0 market as well as its dedication to selling premium differentiated and innovative cannabis products. Going forward, we expect the cannabis 2.0 market to serve as a major revenue generator for the entire business and will be closely monitoring this aspect  of the operation.

One of the developments that helped Auxly achieve this milestone is related to the completion of the second-floor expansion at its Dosecann facility. The completion of the expansion made it so the company could significantly increase production, fulfillment rates, and the sale of cannabis products.

In 2020, Auxly introduced several new cannabis products to the market with the launch of the Back Forty brand, Foray Hard Maple Caramels, Dosecann Capsules, Kolab Project Cherry Cola Pop milk chocolates and Kolab Project 232 Series live terpene vape cartridges. Going forward, we expect the company to bring additional 2.0 products to market and will monitor how the product line continues to gain traction.

We believe that Auxly is an opportunity that has been flying under the radar. We attributed the muted response to how the company used to operate but believe that the business could be turning a quarter. If Auxly is able to build off this momentum, we expect to see more interest in the opportunity and we will continue to closey follow the story.

If you are interested in learning more about Auxly Cannabis Group, please send an email to support@technical420.com with the subject “Auxly Cannabis Group” to be added to our distribution list.

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Michael Berger

Michael Berger is Managing Partner of StoneBridge Partners LLC. SBP continues to drive market awareness for leading firms in the cannabis industry throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Source: https://technical420.com/cannabis-article/auxly-cannabis-the-clear-cut-way-to-play-canadian-cannabis-2-0/

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USDA Final Rule on Hemp

The post USDA Final Rule on Hemp appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.

Republished by Plato

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USDA Final RuleUSDA Final Rule on Hemp was finally released on January 15, 2021 based on the previous set of USDA hemp regulations that drew public comments from almost 6,000 people. USDA Final Rule on Hemp will be effective on March 22, and is currently available for viewing in the Federal Register.

This time, the latest USDA Final Rule on Hemp makes several highly praised changes, superseding the DEA interim final rule (IFR), that are seen as favorable to both hemp producers and regulatory authorities.

Although contentious aspects of the IFR remain, industry members are hopeful they will be amended in time, and this could represent a new era of more industry friendly regulations.

RELATED POST: Is Delta-8 Legal?

RELATED POST: DEA Hemp Rule (IFR)

What Does USDA Final Hemp Regulations Say

This USDA Final Rule on Hemp includes regulations to approve plans submitted by States and Indian Tribes for the domestic production of hemp. This rule also includes regulations on the Federal hemp production plan for producers in States or territories of Indian Tribes that do not have their own USDA-approved plans.

 The program provides requirements for maintaining records about the land where hemp is produced, testing the levels of total delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, disposing of non-compliant plants, licensing hemp producers, and ensuring compliance under the new program.

The USDA Final Hemp Regulations on Sampling

The USDA Final Rule on Hemp made several changes to sampling that should reduce burdens on both growers and authorities.

After many public comments stating that 15 days was far too little time to collect an appropriate amount of samples from each producer in the state, the rule increased the sampling window. Samples for testing now need to be taken up to 30 days before a farmer plans to harvest.

The rule also slightly modified from where on the plant samples need to be taken. While the IFR required collecting a sample from the top third portion of the plant, USDA Final Rule on Hemp determines samples should be taken “approximately five to eight inches from the ‘main stem’, ‘terminal bud’, or ‘central cola’ of the flowering top of the plant.”

This will allow sampling agents to collect more stem and leaf material than previously allowed and reduce instances of hot crop, given that  stems and leaves typically contain lower levels of cannabinoids, and THC, than the flowers.

Sampling protocols may take into account:

  • seed certification processes that identify varieties that have consistently produced compliant hemp plants;
  • whether the producer is conducting research on hemp at an institution of higher learning or that is funded by a federal, state or tribal government;
  • whether a producer has consistently produced compliant hemp plants over an extended period of time;
  • whether a producer is growing “immature” hemp, such as seedlings, clones, microgreens or other non-flowering cannabis, that does not reach the flowering stage;

SamplingGuidelinesforHemp

 

The USDA Final Hemp Regulations on Testing

Unfortunately, The USDA Final Rule was not as generous answering one of the most highly requested changes in public comments: increasing the limit of THC on hemp. The final rule retains that hemp must remain below 0.3% total THC on a dry-weight basis.

Total THC is defined as the sum of the delta-9 THC and tetrahydrocannabinolic acid. On its own, tetrahydrocannabinolic does not produce psychoactive effects like delta-9 THC, but it can be converted to THC through decarboxylation, which is the process required for testing.

While the final rule implemented generally positive sampling changes for the industry, THC testing will, for the most part, remain burdensome. 

The USDA was unable to change the limit previously established, as that limit was written into law in the 2018 Farm Bill.

However, legislation has already been introduced at the federal level by Sen. Rand Paul to amend that limit to 1%, which would finally put an end to the total THC versus delta-9-THC debate.

Another burdenson regulation that was heavily criticized in the public comments was the requirement for labs testing hemp to be registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

“Although AMS received comments in opposition to this requirement, AMS is retaining the requirement in this final rule that any laboratory testing hemp for purposes of regulatory compliance must be registered with DEA to conduct chemical analysis of controlled substances… ,” the final rule states. “Registration is necessary because laboratories could potentially handle cannabis that tests above 0.3 percent THC on a dry weight basis, which is, by definition, marijuana and a Schedule 1 controlled substance.”

 The USDA announced the delay of the requirement for labs to be registered by the DEA back in 2020, along with others outlined in the IFR, that delay was extended under the USDA Final Rule until December 2022. There is no need to read too much into the situation, but it could mean some acknowledged that those provisions are not necessarily right.

One very positive change made by the USDA Final Rule on the testing front: The negligence threshold was raised from 0.5% to 1%, which means if hemp tests above 0.3% but below 1%, it will still need to be disposed of or remediated, but will not be considered a negligent violation 

  • Those with crops testing at or above 1% THC will receive a Notice of Violation from the USDA
  • Producers with more than three negligent violations within a five-year period will be ineligible to participate in the licensed hemp program for the next five years.
  • Producers are only subject to a maximum of one negligent violation per year, even if their hemp from multiple lots tests up to 1% THC.

If hemp does test “hot” above the 0.3% THC limit, the final rule has given producers additional options for disposal beyond the total destruction written into the IFR.

States now have several options for more productive and less wasteful methods of disposal that can result in useful soil amendments. Those include:

  • plowing under
  • mulching/composting the hemp
  • disking
  • shredding the biomass with a bush mower or chopper.

Producers may also bury or burn their hot hemp. (The AMS implemented these additional options in early 2020, but they were not written into the IFR.)

The final rule implements a brand-new option for hot crops: remediation.

The rule states producers can remediate their material by “removing and destroying flower material, while retaining stalk, stems, leaf material, and seeds.” Producers may also shred the entire plant to create a “biomass-like material” and then retest it for compliance.

Producers also no longer need to use a DEA-registered distributor or law enforcement to dispose of hot hemp.

USDA Final Rule on Hemp and Remediation

The IFR did not provide additional remediation options. The only alternative was to completely dispose of the non-compliant material. This time the final rule implements a brand-new option for hot crops: remediation, mentioning that alternative 82 times throughout the document 

The rule states producers can remediate their material by “removing and destroying flower material, while retaining stalk, stems, leaf material, and seeds.” Producers may also shred the entire plant to create a “biomass-like material” and then retest it for compliance, giving them the opportunity to remediate non-compliant crops in order to minimize financial risk associated with the loss of investment in their hemp crop

Producers also no longer need to use a DEA-registered distributor or law enforcement to dispose of hot hemp.

SamplingGuidelinesforHemp

States now have several options for more productive and less wasteful methods of disposal that can result in useful soil amendments. Those include:

  • plowing under
  • mulching/composting the hemp
  • disking
  • shredding the biomass with a bush mower or chopper.

USDA Final Hemp Rule on WIPHE

The 2018 Farm Bill directed USDA to establish a national regulatory framework for hemp production in the U.S., and the final rule outlines provisions for this mandate. The IFR and this final rule do not cover hemp or its products beyond production. Further, DEA has issued regulations covering some of these products or “in-process materials”. Accordingly, this final rule does not address “in-process materials,” processors, end-products, processing of CBD or other cannabinoids or anything that may contain hemp or hemp byproducts.

Don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

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How to get a Michigan Dispensary License

How to get a Michigan Dispensary License  A Michigan Dispensary License is a legal document that allows its holder to possess, store, test, sell, transfer purchase or transport marijuana to or from a marijuana establishment, whose primary aim would be to sell…

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316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
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316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
Peoria, Illinois 61602

Phone: (309) 740-4033 || Email:  tom@collateralbase.com

cannabis industry lawyer

316 SW Washington St,Peoria,
IL 61602, USA
Call Us (309) 740-4033 || e-Mail Us tom@collateralbase.com

Source: https://www.cannabisindustrylawyer.com/usda-final-rule-on-hemp/

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How to get a Michigan Dispensary License

The post How to get a Michigan Dispensary License appeared first on Cannabis Industry Lawyer – Tom Howard.

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Michigan Dispensary LicenseA Michigan Dispensary License is a legal document that allows its holder to possess, store, test, sell, transfer purchase or transport marijuana to or from a marijuana establishment, whose primary aim would be to sell marijuana products to individuals that are 21 years old or older.

In that sense, getting a dispensary license should be your top priority if you want to enter the adult-use cannabis industry in Michigan.

Below, you’ll find the answers to many questions regarding how to get a dispensary license in Michigan, what’s the cost of getting a Michigan dispensary license, and what do you need in order to apply for one.

How to get a Michigan dispensary license

Michigan works with a “two-step” program, in which you’d need to prequalify to get a Michigan marijuana license, and then get licensing qualification. If you want to know more about the process of prequalification in Michigan, you might want to check our ‘How To Get Prequalified for a Michigan Marijuana License’ post.

A Michigan dispensary license prequalification involves quite a bit of audit of the applicant’s financial and operational history, as well as relevant information such as data of all significant stakeholders and their spouses. Applicants undergoing the prequalification process will be required to collect, process, and submit a significant amount of information to the Michigan Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA).

Once you and any supplemental applicant complete the prequalification process, you’ll be able to move to the second step of the Michigan marijuana licensing process: licensing qualification, which includes the review of the proposed retail establishment, including a physical inspection, as well as payment of the licensure fee once approved.

Business owners that would like to acquire a Michigan dispensary license will need to submit an application and pay the licensing fees. You can check the application resources and download application forms at the MRA’s adult-use marijuana application page.

Michigan Dispensary License Requirements

According to the latest legislation on the matter, each applicant has to disclose the identity of any other person who has control whether directly or indirectly over the applicant, including –but not limited to- date of birth, government-issued identification, and any other documents required by the agency.

As well, the applicant will have to provide:

  • Financial statements
  • Property ownership information, including deeds, leases, rental agreements, real estate trusts or purchase agreements.
  • Tax information
  • Disclosure of the applicant of the identity of people who control –directly or indirectly- or are controlled by the applicant.
  • Disclosure of all shareholders holding a direct or indirect interest of greater than 5%, as well as officers and directors of the proposed marijuana facility
  • The sources and the total amount of the applicant’s capitalization to operate and maintain the marijuana facility.
  • A financial statement attested by a certified public accountant.
  • Information on the financial ability of the applicant to purchase and maintain adequate liability and casualty insurance.
  • Any other disclosure or requirement requested by the MRA

Another requirement you need to provide in order to complete the application process is a description of the type of marijuana business that includes:

  • An estimate or the actual number of employees
  • The projected or actual gross receipts
  • A business plan
  • The proposed location for the marijuana business
  • A security plan
  • A copy of the proposed marijuana business location plan

After all of this, the applicant has to confirm that he is in compliance with any municipal ordinance that its municipality may have adopted under the medical marijuana facilities licensing act, or the Michigan regulation and taxation of marijuana act.

If the MRA identifies a deficiency in the application, it will have to notify the applicant and the applicant must submit the missing information or proof that the deficiency has been corrected to the agency within 5 days of the date the applicant received the deficiency notice.  If the applicant doesn’t correct the deficiency, the agency will deny its application.

RELATED POST: HOW TO OPEN A MARIJUANA DISPENSARY IN MICHIGAN

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How much is a Michigan dispensary license 

Take into consideration that some types of applicants may qualify for reduced application fees, such as social-equity applicants.  However, the fees of getting a Michigan dispensary license can be steep. The application fee must be submitted before an application can be processed and is usually $6,000 for a state license.

There are also municipal licensing fees that must be paid to most cities where facilities are permitted to be located. Most municipalities charge a $5,000.00 non-refundable fee, though there are some that charge less.

This obviously doesn’t include additional costs such as renewal fees, the three percent tax on the dispensary’s gross retail receipts, and –maybe even more important- the costs of investigation and processing during the application process, needed in order to get the license.

Further, you will need real estate, which has to meet zone requirements. There are laws in Michigan that place restrictions on where you can open a retail marijuana dispensary. If you’re unsure whether your location is appropriate for the venture, make sure to seek guidance and contact a professional.

Under state law, no marijuana retail establishment can be located in an area specifically zoned for residential use.  Additionally, a marijuana dispensary can’t be opened within 1,000 feet of any school that accommodates grades K-12. 

Local municipalities may reduce the distance requirement or impose other location requirements as they see fit. What this means is: you have to check with your local authorities if it’s allowed to open a business in your municipality.

You’ll also need to have the capital for your operation, for which it’s recommended budgeting for at least $500,000 to be on the safe side. It may seem like much, but the state won’t give a license to a business that they consider likely to flop. 

So, you would probably need to look for investors, because no bank or financial institution is going to lay a finger in any cannabis business until federal legalization occurs. 

In order to raise money, we’d recommend checking our startup bundle package, which provides your team an application-ready business plan, a pitch deck in order to secure investors, and a fundraising suite to legally raise money to use in your application.

Ineligibility for a Michigan dispensary license

A Michigan dispensary license applications will be declared ineligible if any of the following circumstances exist:

  • The applicant has a prior conviction that involved the distribution of a controlled substance to a minor.
  • The applicant has knowingly submitted an application for a state license under the Michigan regulation and taxation act that contains false information
  • The applicant is an employee, advisor, or consultant of the agency involved in the implementation, administration, or enforcement of the Michigan regulation and taxation of marihuana act
  • The applicant holds an elective office of a governmental unit of Michigan, another state, or the federal government; is a member of or employed by a regulatory body of a governmental unit in Michigan, another state, or the federal government; or is employed by a governmental unit of Michigan. This subdivision does not apply to an elected officer of or employee of a federally recognized Indian tribe or to an elected precinct delegate.
  • The applicant does not hold a state operating license pursuant to the MMFLA and is applying for a marihuana retailer license under the Michigan regulation and taxation of marihuana act and the marijuana facility/establishment administrative rules on licensing published by the MRA.
  • The agency determines the municipality in which the applicant’s proposed marihuana establishment will operate has adopted an ordinance that prohibits marihuana establishments or that the proposed establishment is noncompliant with an ordinance adopted by the municipality under section 6 of the Michigan regulation and taxation of marihuana act
  • The applicant will hold an ownership interest in both a marihuana safety compliance facility or in a marihuana secure transporter and in a marihuana grower, a marihuana processor, a marihuana retailer, or a marihuana microbusiness
  • The applicant will hold an ownership interest in both a marihuana microbusiness and in a marihuana grower, a marihuana processor, a marihuana retailer, a marihuana safety compliance facility, or a marihuana secure transporter
  • The applicant will hold an ownership interest in more than 5 marihuana growers or in more than 1 marihuana microbusiness
  • The applicant fails to meet other criteria established in the rules enacted by the MRA.

The MRA will also take into consideration deciding whether or not to grant a license the following:

  • Whether the applicant has convictions involving dishonesty, theft, or fraud, which indicates that e the proposed marihuana establishment is unlikely to be operated with honesty and integrity.
  • Whether the applicant has been served with a complaint or other notice filed with any public body regarding payment of any tax required under federal, state, or local law that has been delinquent for 1 or more years.
  • Whether the applicant has a history of noncompliance with any regulatory requirements, all legal judgments, lawsuits, legal proceedings, charges, or government investigations, whether initiated, pending, or concluded, against the applicant, that are related to business operations, including, but not limited to fraud, environmental, food safety, labor, employment, worker’s compensation, discrimination, and tax laws and regulations, in Michigan or any other jurisdiction
  • Whether the applicant meets other standards in rules applicable to the state license category.
  •  

Don’t miss out on our Marijuana Legalization Map where you can browse the current status of laws in every state in the United States and see all our posts on each of them.

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Interested in coming on as a guest? Email our producer at lauryn@cannabislegalizaitonnews.com

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New York’s Cannabis Cultivation License

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Cannabis license: what would you need in order to apply for one?

Nowadays, the Cannabis industry is expanding at an extremely fast rate. And as more states are creating laws that allow businesses to legally produce and sell cannabis products, just getting to apply for a cannabis license may get confusing. A cannabis license is a…


316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
Peoria, Illinois 61602

Phone: (309) 740-4033 || Email:  tom@collateralbase.com


316 SW Washington Street, Suite 1A
Peoria, Illinois 61602

Phone: (309) 740-4033 || Email:  tom@collateralbase.com

cannabis industry lawyer

316 SW Washington St,Peoria,
IL 61602, USA
Call Us (309) 740-4033 || e-Mail Us tom@collateralbase.com

Source: https://www.cannabisindustrylawyer.com/how-to-get-a-michigan-dispensary-license/

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Heartland3 days ago

Looking for something similar to FEALS but less pricey.

Heartland4 days ago

A Permanent solution to the import impasse on children’s CBD-based medication has emerged with the Dutch manufacturer set to see the medicines made in the UK

Heartland9 hours ago

is it possible for accidental thc product in my cbd cigarettes?

Heartland5 days ago

New Wave Welcomes Iman Nevab, Homeopathic Research Expert to the Scientific Advisory Board

News4 days ago

Florida Lawmakers Pushing For Cannabis Law Changes And Reform

Heartland4 days ago

Topical CBD feels amazing

Heartland5 days ago

Anybody ever bought from highkind? Review?

Heartland5 days ago

Psyched Wellness Submits an Application to Register a Trademark for the Company’s Unique Extraction

Heartland4 days ago

My new ‘Up in Smoke’ 40th Anniversary Rolling Tray! 🌱🎱😎 Love it! High Quality and Much Larger than Anticipated!

Heartland5 days ago

Cannabis Antibiotics: Answer to Disease-Resistant Bacteria

Heartland4 days ago

Never been a “flavored” CBD person but the hint of mint in this product is not bad.

Heartland3 days ago

Anyone had issues ordering from the US to the uk

Heartland4 days ago

Cannabis for Eating Disorders Like Anorexia

Heartland4 days ago

Quitting Nicotine

Heartland3 days ago

Anyone heard of or have tried this brand? Location near Dallas Texas

Heartland4 days ago

Update – bought some of this 33% Moonbarguy hash instead of the HempHash. Hope it’s better

Heartland3 days ago

CBD oil causing issues with heart

Heartland3 days ago

1 dropper CBD VS 2 droppers CBD = dramatic contrast in effect

Heartland4 days ago

How CBD changed a young boy’s life

Heartland3 days ago

Newbie questions regarding cbd & anxiety

Heartland5 days ago

Minty taste when vaping CBD isolate?

Heartland4 days ago

Horizons ETFs to Launch World’s First Psychedelics-Focused ETF

Uncategorized4 days ago

USDA Final Rule on Hemp

Heartland4 days ago

Even Bernie is a fan of The Green Claw

Heartland4 days ago

Mendo x Royal Kush

Heartland3 days ago

What Is Kief And How To Use It | Honest Marijuana

Heartland3 days ago

CBG is so amazing for me! I guess it’s different for everyone but it has way more health benefits than CBD! I’ve been ordering by the case from centurioncbg, this is the best pain relief lotion I’ve ever had. Anyone try them yet? Or any CBG?

Heartland2 days ago

Can someone tell me what type of CBD liquid I’m supposed to put in a vape pen refillable cartridge?

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