Connect with us

Heartland

Cannabis in Light of the Opioid Crisis | Best Feeling UK | CBD Alternatives | A Goop blog

Cannabis in Light of the Opioid Crisis 

It’s been hotly debated for years: Does cannabis have a legitimate medical use? It’s a Schedule I drug in the United States, meaning the federal government’s official view was—and still is—that marijuana has no legitimate medical purpose. Individual states, however, have recognized the research on marijuana’s clinical benefits for a variety of conditions. Now the first cannabis-derived drug—Epidolex, an oral cannabidiol (CBD) solution used to ease seizures in two rare forms of epilepsy—has been approved by the FDA, and the specific formulation rescheduled to Schedule V (meaning it has accepted medical use and low potential for abuse). This doesn’t affect the scheduling of other CBD products but may open the door for other cannabis-derived drugs in the future.

More

Republished by Plato

Published

on

It’s been hotly debated for years: Does cannabis have a legitimate medical use? It’s a Schedule I drug in the United States, meaning the federal government’s official view was—and still is—that marijuana has no legitimate medical purpose. Individual states, however, have recognized the research on marijuana’s clinical benefits for a variety of conditions. Now the first cannabis-derived drug—Epidolex, an oral cannabidiol (CBD) solution used to ease seizures in two rare forms of epilepsy—has been approved by the FDA, and the specific formulation rescheduled to Schedule V (meaning it has accepted medical use and low potential for abuse). This doesn’t affect the scheduling of other CBD products but may open the door for other cannabis-derived drugs in the future. And current research suggests they may be useful medications for pervasive and often debilitating conditions, including opioid addiction, which has been declared a national public health emergency.

Yasmin Hurd, PhD, the director of Mount Sinai’s Addiction Institute in New York City, studies the neurobiology of addiction. Hurd argues for a paradigm shift in the way we think about cannabis: It’s not just “weed”; it can be medicine in some forms—and policymakers should take it seriously. While the existing evidence is preliminary, preclinical studies suggest CBD might support people who are fighting addiction and trying to abstain from opioids. “It’s about preventing relapse,” Hurd says of using cannabis for opioid addiction treatment. And perhaps more pointedly: “It’s about saving lives.”

Still, Hurd says, cannabis is not a wonder drug—or necessarily always a safe one. While there is potential for a lot of help, there is also the potential for harm. We spoke to Hurd about cannabis, opioid addiction, and how one may help with the other.

A Q&A with Yasmin Hurd, PhD

Q

Why is getting off of opioids so hard? And how could CBD help?

A

Detoxing someone from opioids is a relatively easy process—although it is difficult for that person, particularly the first two days or so. Detoxification is not the greatest problem; it’s the maintenance of abstinence that’s difficult. People relapse during opioid abstinence because they have intense cravings for the drug. Thus, it becomes nearly impossible to resist the urge to use the drug again.

People use methadone, an opioid substitution medication, to taper off of opioids—and CBD is being considered as an adjunct or alternative option. We can use it alone or in combination with methadone. There are no established opioid taper programs that include CBD, but we are currently trying to develop them. CBD decreases the cravings and anxiety that trigger relapse, and it also reduces opioid-seeking behavior—an effect we first discovered in studies where CBD reduced heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

Unlike opioids, CBD is not rewarding to the brain; since it’s not rewarding, people don’t become addicted to it.

Also, CBD may decrease long-term dependence and addiction in people maintained on chronic opioids for pain management, and we can help the process by introducing it early on in that treatment. We don’t have to wait for someone to become addicted to opioids for CBD to be useful. By combining CBD with opioid medications while those opioids are being prescribed, we can decrease the amount of opioids someone might need to manage their pain, as well as start to minimize some of the negative effects of long-term opioid use.

CBD is, unfortunately, still considered a Schedule I drug under the umbrella of “marijuana,” and so it’s restricted by state and federal laws that does not allow it to be officially prescribed. In the state of New York, for example, physicians who sign up for the Medical Marijuana Program can “recommend” medical marijuana for people, who then get a license to purchase it from a dispensary. They choose the form and amount depending on the company they choose to buy from. This is a major issue to me. For us to truly have “medical CBD,” it should be like all other medications that are obtained from legitimate pharmacies: through a physician prescription where the clinician provides informed guidelines regarding amount and frequency of CBD administration for the particular symptom or disorder.


Q

Does THC also have a role?

A

Opioids are often prescribed for pain, and that’s where it became an epidemic: As physicians began giving them out in large and very potent doses for an extended period of time, people became addicted—and many died because of it. Research is still in progress, but small doses of THC might reduce the amount of opioids needed to manage pain.


Q

What are we looking for right now in terms of research?

A

We need a faster way to test whether something works or not. With so many people dying from the opioid crisis, time is of the essence.

The misconception is that cannabis is highly addictive and has no legitimate medical value. That’s simply incorrect—but in order to identify and isolate the compounds that have medicinal properties and formulate them into medications, we need randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. We’re in need of greater flexibility from the federal government to do that research.

Other researchers are studying cannabis around the world, so I hope we will soon have more data to determine whether or not there is sufficient evidence to start implementing cannabis in routine clinical processes.


Q

What does the opioid prescription rate look like in states where recreational marijuana is legal?

A

Accumulated evidence has shown that opioid prescription rates are lower in those states that have legalized recreational marijuana. We don’t know the reason why yet. It could be that people are using THC as a replacement pain reliever. Or it could be that if they’re taking marijuana that has more CBD, the CBD may be having an effect on their craving centers. That’s why we need to do these studies to see whether the use of cannabidiol does decrease opioid use in a controlled setting.


Q

Cannabis is becoming more publicly accepted in the US, but there’s still a stigma attached—which often comes up in politics. What would it take to have cannabis recognized as a legitimate therapeutic tool?

A

It’s about educating politicians and educating the public. A lot of politicians who have voted for medical legalization don’t have a true understanding of the science. But when it became a point for election and reelection—and when one scientific breakthrough showed CBD could help kids with epilepsy—there was a bigger political push.

In addition, many people have used the term “medical marijuana” and pushed for medical legalization as an inroad to legalizing recreational marijuana. In doing so, they have corrupted the term “medical marijuana.” We should get rid of that term; I argue we should use “medical cannabinoids.”

The stigma has definitely decreased, but it’s still there because some people think that legalization efforts for medical marijuana are just about people trying to get high. People don’t always understand that CBD itself doesn’t make you high.

There is medicinal value to cannabinoids. I want the stigma to be associated with misuse, not clinical use under a physician’s guidelines.


Q

What’s your stance on legalization?

A

I did not agree with legalizing marijuana for recreational use—about 30 percent of users will go on to develop a problematic use of cannabis—but I also see that marijuana use has helped with some medical and psychiatric disorders.

It’s unfair that the criminal justice system penalizes marijuana use, especially for black or brown people.

I want to emphasize that a lot of research still needs to be done, and I think there are medicinal benefits, but these are for people with certain disorders. I want the public to realize that just because CBD and other cannabinoids may have medicinal value doesn’t mean that we can now just start using it in regular daily life. They’re still drugs. We need to be diligent about what we’re taking. I don’t want people to get so comfortable that they don’t realize that there are issues with high-dose THC—it’s not a benign drug. High-dose THC does have a lasting, acute impact that can cause serious harm. We need to really be careful and educate everyone about the recreational and medical effects of cannabis.


Yasmin Hurd, PhD, is a professor of neuroscience, psychiatry, and pharmacological studies and the director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai. She publishes research on the neurobiology of addiction as well as the effects of drug exposure on brain development.

This blog was originally posted on www.goop.com 

Use left/right arrows to navigate the slideshow or swipe left/right if using a mobile device

Source: https://www.bestfeeling.co.uk/blogs/news/cannabis-in-light-of-the-opioid-crisis-best-feeling-uk-cbd-alternatives-a-goop-blog

Heartland

Can cbd help prevent hearing loss due to noise?

Republished by Plato

Published

on

Visit our community site for vetted suppliers at http://theCBD.place. It’s time that this subject was given more internet exposure. We are here to discuss topics related to medical marijuana and our experiences using CBD. Please do not assume that anyone here is a medical professional.

Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/CBD/comments/l5b0ik/can_cbd_help_prevent_hearing_loss_due_to_noise/

Continue Reading

Heartland

Europe – Where to incorporate CBD affiliate company

Republished by Plato

Published

on

I’m looking for advice. I have been working on CBD affiliate sites for the last few months, the sites are starting to have a decent amount of traffic and I need to incorporate a company.

The question is; where should I incorporate it? I’m not looking for massive tax breaks, but rather a country where the banking isn’t a massive headache and a place where I don’t have to be personally present.

Source: https://www.reddit.com/r/CBD/comments/l59wcr/europe_where_to_incorporate_cbd_affiliate_company/

Continue Reading

Heartland

Plant Power: Everyday Plants That Activate the Endocannabinoid System

When people hear about cannabinoids, they automatically think of cannabis (which makes sense, given the name). What most have yet to realize is that many other plants make cannabinoids too – a lot of everyday flowers, vegetables, and spices that you probably wouldn’t expect. This train of thought was not exclusive to consumers though; until […]

The post Plant Power: Everyday Plants That Activate the Endocannabinoid System appeared first on CBD Testers.

Republished by Plato

Published

on

When people hear about cannabinoids, they automatically think of cannabis (which makes sense, given the name). What most have yet to realize is that many other plants make cannabinoids too – a lot of everyday flowers, vegetables, and spices that you probably wouldn’t expect.

This train of thought was not exclusive to consumers though; until recently, even scientists had only been able to identify cannabinoids in the cannabis plant. But current studies have found these compounds in a handful of common, day-to-day plants, including clove, black pepper, cocoa, echinacea, broccoli, ginseng, hops, and even carrots.

But no matter how much of these plants you consume, they won’t feel any type of psychedelic effects. This is because they don’t have the cannabinoids we’re all familiar with, like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), or cannabigerol (CBN). Rather, they have their own compounds that directly engage our Endocannabinoid Systems (ECS).

The ECS is itself only recently discovered, and understanding how different phytocannabinoids interact with this network of neurotransmitters in our bodies can lead to important medical innovations in the future. Ones that are natural, safer for patients, and more focused on plant-based healthcare.

To learn more about cannabis, and for exclusive deals on flowers and other products, subscribe to The CBD Flowers Weekly Newsletter


Pain-relieving drugs made from plants

­Chronic pain affects at least 10 percent of the global population, which is approximately 60 million people. However, experts estimate that figure to be closer to 20-25 percent on some countries and regions. Finding a solution that doesn’t put patients at risk for addiction and addition problems, is paramount.

As we humans have done since the dawn of time, we continue looking to the plant world for ways to improve our health and wellbeing. Cannabinoids might be the trendiest at the moment, but they’re certainly not the only plant-based compound that’s been utilized to help fight pain.

Opiates

Opiates get a bad rap because of their high rate for addiction and abuse, but they do have an important place in the world of medicine. Very intense pain, post-surgical or from a broken bone for example, typically won’t respond to cannabinoids. Something stronger like morphine, codeine, and other opiate drugs are sometimes necessary. They have many added ingredients these days, but believe-it-or-not, these medicates have a natural element to them. Opiates are made from opium, which comes from the poppy plant. Just like cannabinoids, these pharmaceutical drugs interact with opiate receptors in the human brain, which is why they can be incredibly effective when used responsibly.

Aspirin

Dating back to ancient Egypt, tea made from the willow tree was used to manage pain and reduce fever. Fast forward a few centuries and scientists are looking at the willow tree yet again, this time isolating the active compound used in that ancient tea – salicylic acid – and used it to formulate numerous medications used to treat pain and inflammation; most notably, aspirin. Salicylic acid is also a very common active ingredient in acne medication.

Anesthetics

Common anesthetics like lidocaine, used routinely by dentists to numb the mouth before initializing treatment, are also distantly related to wild plant – Coca. The leaves of the coca plant were used in the ancient Incan Empire in South America to treat many different levels of pain, from headaches to fractures. Eventually, the coca plant gave way to the drug cocaine, which is an illegal drug of abuse but also a very effective anesthetic.   

Plant cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system

Cannabis has been used medicinally for centuries, but it wasn’t until recently that science started to catch up with what our ancestors have been telling us. Ancient texts from China, Egypt, Tibet, and many other parts of the world hail cannabis as a natural remedy for numerous ailments including pain, inflammation, nausea, anxiety, epilepsy, and even sexual dysfunction. But how can one plant serve so many different functions in the human body? It all boils down to a network of receptors and neurotransmitters known as the Endocannabinoid System (ECS).

Unfortunately, the federally illegal status of cannabis and its use as a recreational drug has been a major hinderance on the ability of researchers to study the full capabilities of this plant. Until recently, most of the information we had came from scientists in Israel, where they had less restrictions when it came to using the plant compounds medicinally.

The Endocannabinoid System (ECS) is involved in multiple physiological processes including appetite regulation, pain threshold, sleep/wake cycles, memory, and mood. It plays a major role in allowing our bodies to achieve homeostasis, or internal balance. The discovery of the ECS shed new light on how and why plant-based cannabinoids, or phytocannabinoids, affect humans in the way they do. In cannabis alone, over 80 phytocannabinoids have been indexed and these compounds exist in many, many plants we consume regularly.

Other plants that engage the ECS

Like cannabis, many other plants have compounds that engage the endocannabinoid system, and with growing attention on this newly-discovered system, the more sources of phytocannabinoids we have the better. While these other plants don’t have cannabinoids as we know them, many of them contains Alkylamides, compounds that are structurally similar to endocannabinoids, and terpenes, that give plants their unique aromas – both of which effectively activate the ECS.

Plants of interest include (but not limited to):

  • Black pepper
  • Hops
  • Helichrysum
  • Oregano
  • Cinnamon
  • Carrots
  • Basil
  • Cloves
  • Lavender
  • Rosemary
  • Cocoa
  • Echinacea
  • Black truffles
  • Electric daisies
  • Liverwort
  • Kava

More about plant terpenes

Worth an additional mention since they often work synergistically with cannabinoids, in addition to activating the endocannabinoid system indirectly. Terpenes are a very large and diverse class of organic compounds that are produced by a wide variety of plants, including the ones listed above. In cannabis, they are secreted by the same glands that produce some of the more dominant cannabinoids including THC and CBD. Their role and effects are quite different, however.

Terpenes are aromatic plant oils that, when combined with other plant compounds, create a never-ending palate of scents and flavors. In nature, terps serve as a defense mechanism by deterring herbivores and by attracting predators and parasites that attack herbivores.

Chemically, terpenes are hydrocarbons, and they differ from terpenoids, which typically have added functional groups such as oxygen. The words “terpenes” and “terpenoids” are often used interchangeably but this is incorrect. Terpenes are also the major component of rosin, which a sap/waxy-like substance that is produced when cannabis buds are placed under high heat and pressure. Climate, weather, age and maturation, fertilizers, soil type, and light cycles can have an impact on the development of terpenes.

As far as cannabis goes, terpenes are the key to differentiating the effects and flavor of a strain. Some terpenes are relaxing, like those found in lavender, while others are energizing, like citrus. Some smell fruity, some are piney, others are musky, or even floral. There really is no limit to the variation. So far, over 100 different terpenes have been discovered in cannabis plants alone, and each strain typically has its own unique blend and composition of terps.

Terpenes have long been known to hold great therapeutic value, and some of the more common ones have been studied more extensively, considering they’re found in many different types of legal plants. More research is needed to determine the extent of their medicinal effects when combined with other cannabis plant compounds.

Conclusion

No matter how many veggies you munch on, or how many spices you add to your dish, you won’t get high from it like you would with actual cannabis. Our everyday plants don’t have THC, CBD, or any of the other major cannabinoids, but they have their own structurally similar compounds that engage with our Endocannabinoid Systems and can offer us natural, medicinal possibilities well beyond what science ever believed would be possible.

Thank you for visiting CBDtesters.co, your #1 spot for all cannabis-related news and information. Join us regularly to keep up with the world of legal cannabis, and sign up to our newsletter so you’re always in the know!


RESOURCES:

It Was Just a Matter of Time: GMO Cannabis on Its Way
Compared to Prescription Medication, Medical Cannabis Not Always Affordable Alternative
A Brief History Of CBD The Week in Review: Canadian Cannabis, Antibiotic Resistance, Father’s Day Gift Ideas, and more
Can You Treat COVID-19 With CBD and Reduce Mortality Rates? A New Israeli Research Believes You Can!

Not Just for Getting High – The Underreported Medical Uses of THC
In a world plagued with antibiotic resistance, look to cannabis as a natural alternative
The CBD Flowers Weekly newsletter (your top resource for all things smokable hemp flowers)
The Medical Cannabis Weekly newsletter (International medical cannabis business report)
Cannabis Heroes of History: How Robert Randall Beat the U.S.

The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter (All you need to know about Delta 8 thc) and the Best Black Friday Delta 8 THC Deals 2020.  The best delta-8 THC deals, coupons and discounts.
The Medical Cannabis Weekly Review: Antibiotic Resistance, Cannabis in Italy, CBD for Weight Loss, and more Argentina Allows Cannabis Self-Cultivation
CBG Study Shows Antimicrobial Properties of Cannabis

Source: https://cbdtesters.co/2021/01/26/plants-cannabinoids-endocannabinoid-system/

Continue Reading
News5 days ago

Jay-Z Announces Launch of Investment Fund To Aid Minority Cannabis Entrepreneurs

News20 hours ago

Cansortium Inc. Appoints CEO Robert Beasley to Board of Directors

Heartland3 days ago

Looking for something similar to FEALS but less pricey.

Heartland4 days ago

A Permanent solution to the import impasse on children’s CBD-based medication has emerged with the Dutch manufacturer set to see the medicines made in the UK

Heartland9 hours ago

is it possible for accidental thc product in my cbd cigarettes?

Heartland5 days ago

New Wave Welcomes Iman Nevab, Homeopathic Research Expert to the Scientific Advisory Board

News4 days ago

Florida Lawmakers Pushing For Cannabis Law Changes And Reform

Heartland4 days ago

Topical CBD feels amazing

Heartland5 days ago

Anybody ever bought from highkind? Review?

Heartland5 days ago

Psyched Wellness Submits an Application to Register a Trademark for the Company’s Unique Extraction

Heartland4 days ago

My new ‘Up in Smoke’ 40th Anniversary Rolling Tray! 🌱🎱😎 Love it! High Quality and Much Larger than Anticipated!

Heartland5 days ago

Cannabis Antibiotics: Answer to Disease-Resistant Bacteria

Heartland4 days ago

Never been a “flavored” CBD person but the hint of mint in this product is not bad.

Heartland3 days ago

Anyone had issues ordering from the US to the uk

Heartland4 days ago

Cannabis for Eating Disorders Like Anorexia

Heartland4 days ago

Quitting Nicotine

Heartland3 days ago

Anyone heard of or have tried this brand? Location near Dallas Texas

Heartland4 days ago

Update – bought some of this 33% Moonbarguy hash instead of the HempHash. Hope it’s better

Heartland3 days ago

CBD oil causing issues with heart

Heartland3 days ago

1 dropper CBD VS 2 droppers CBD = dramatic contrast in effect

Heartland4 days ago

How CBD changed a young boy’s life

Heartland3 days ago

Newbie questions regarding cbd & anxiety

Heartland5 days ago

Minty taste when vaping CBD isolate?

Heartland4 days ago

Horizons ETFs to Launch World’s First Psychedelics-Focused ETF

Uncategorized4 days ago

USDA Final Rule on Hemp

Heartland4 days ago

Even Bernie is a fan of The Green Claw

Heartland4 days ago

Mendo x Royal Kush

Heartland3 days ago

What Is Kief And How To Use It | Honest Marijuana

Heartland3 days ago

CBG is so amazing for me! I guess it’s different for everyone but it has way more health benefits than CBD! I’ve been ordering by the case from centurioncbg, this is the best pain relief lotion I’ve ever had. Anyone try them yet? Or any CBG?

Heartland2 days ago

Can someone tell me what type of CBD liquid I’m supposed to put in a vape pen refillable cartridge?

Trending

A Cloud Nine Capital Entity Copyright © 2020 – All Rights Reserved Proudly Made in America